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Rumor: LG to launch foldable display phones in 2017

LG G3

As per a new report, #LG is preparing to bring foldable display phones to the market as early as next year. It’s no secret that the Korean manufacturer has been working on the technology for quite some time now, and it seems like it will be the first to bring it to the market, perhaps beating even Samsung to it.

Samsung has also teased its foldable YOUM display tech before and a launch is expected next year. We don’t have a proper word from LG right now, but a rumor is at least a start. Backing up this rumor is a contract signed with Canadian company, IGNIS Innovation, which makes the internal circuitry for foldable display phones. It is said that LG’s foldable devices department has finally moved from R&D to development, which is a sign that the company is ready for the big step.

Of course, all of this is hearsay at this point, but we wouldn’t put it past an innovative company like LG to expedite the production and development of its foldable display panels. The future certainly looks bright for us tech lovers.

Source: ET News

Via: Phone Arena

Galaxy Note 5 touchscreen is inaccurate, other LCD screen problems

Note 5 screen

We’ve come across a number of screen-related problems on the #GalaxyNote5 this past few weeks so we share them here today. If you’ll continue reading, you’ll notice that many of the cases are hardware in nature so there’s really little to nothing that we can do about them when it comes to troubleshooting. Our blog does not provide hardware tips or fixes, but we hope that enlightening you to have your device checked by a technician is a good first step towards resolution.

These are the specific issues tackled here today:

  1. Galaxy Note 5 touchscreen not working
  2. Galaxy Note 5 black screen issue
  3. Galaxy Note 5 touchscreen is inaccurate
  4. Dropped Galaxy Note 5 has blurry green screen
  5. Galaxy Note 5 screen issue when phone is inactive
  6. Galaxy Note 5 fingerprint scanner issue when charging

If you are looking for solutions to your own #Android issue, you can contact us by using the link provided at the bottom of this page.


 

Problem #1: Galaxy Note 5 touchscreen not working

So everything works just fine, the screen lights up, goes to dimmer sleep mode, then black , wakes up just fine. All the pixels move ( currently i have an alarm that needs dismissing and the arrows are glowing and moving across the screen)  but the touch screen doesn’t work so i can’t dismiss the alarm, i can’t answer the phone. i can’t DO anything!!! 

Volume up/ down, home and OFF button work just fine. HELP PLEASE. Phone is in mint condition but the warranty ran out December 19 so i’m kinda screwed. — Naloxone

Solution: Hi Naloxone. Based on the problem description, the issue appears to be hardware in nature so doing the usual software troubleshooting we provide in this blog won’t help. The only thing that you can do on your end right now is to test the display or screen status via service menu (if you can manage it given how erratic the display works right now). To access the service menu, simply dial *#08#. The tests in the service menu are self-explanatory so you shouldn’t need any explanation what the results mean. Regardless of the results though, we recommend that you let a professional handle your phone so they can check and decide what to do with it. Hopefully, the issue is only isolated with the screen, as that can be easily replaced. However, if the problem involves other components in the logic board, repair may not guarantee a fully functioning phone afterwards.

Problem #2: Galaxy Note 5 black screen issue

Hello. Recently i accidentally dropped my mother’s phone. The result was a black screen and we had difficulty turning the phone on. The 2 buttons located at the bottom of the phone would light up but nothing else would work. Apparently after a few hours of trying to troubleshoot it, she managed to get it to turn on and everything  working fine but at random moment my mothers found out that something located on the left side of the phone is causing the problem once you apply pressure to it.

Is there any troubleshooting method we could use or is there anything you can recommend to get it fixed? If anything, thank you and have a nice day. — Emily

Solution: Hi Emily. Just like water damage, dropping a phone can result to all sorts of problems. There clearly is a hardware issue on your mom’s phone right now so the best course of action is to have the phone checked by Samsung or a shop. If it was provided by your wireless carrier, make sure to talk to them about how to get the phone replaced. Keep in mind that any physical damage on the phone voids the warranty. Whatever action you take to have this device fixed or replaced, you are surely going to invest something. We don’t know what’s the arrangement with your carrier about device replacement but they may be the best option where to get a replacement device at this time.

Problem #3: Galaxy Note 5 touchscreen is inaccurate

I’m having huge problems with my Samsung Galaxy Note 5 for the last few months! I bought my phone during second hand half a year back with Android 5.0.1 Lollipop and it worked great for the first couple of weeks. Then it started to make really strange problems with its touchscreen. When I unlock my phone the touchscreen is really inaccurate when I try to open an application it opens the one next to it (right or left to it). When I open the keyboard to write a message and press a letter it presses a letter next to the one I pressed and whatever I do the screen is completely inaccurate. The only way to fix it was to just turn the screen off and then on back again, then it would work fine. The problem occurs everyday.

When I leave the phone for more than 15-20 minutes without using it, when I unlock it the problem occurs. I tried rebooting the phone everyday but that didn’t help. still the phone kept making this problem like 5-10 times a day and its really frustrating. Please if anyone could help me! — Angel

Solution: Hi Angel. The problem may be caused by a third party app. Kindly boot the phone in safe mode and run it like that for 24 hours. While in safe mode, third party apps will be prevented from running so it’s a good thing to do to verify our hunch. Here are the steps to do it:

  • Turn off the phone completely.
  • Press and hold the Power key.
  • Once ‘Samsung Galaxy Note5’ shows, release the Power key and immediately press and hold the Volume Down button.
  • The phone will restart but keep the Volume Down button pressed.
  • Once the phone has finished restarting, ‘Safe mode’ will be display in the lower-left corner of the screen.
  • You may now release the Volume Down button.

If the issue fails to occur in safe mode, that’s an indication that one of your apps is problematic.

Problem #4: Dropped Galaxy Note 5 has blurry green screen

Hi Droid Guy. I dropped my Samsung Galaxy Note 5 phone today. The screen was already cracked beforehand but today I saw that blurry green screen of lines (like when you break your computer screen) flash before it all turned black.

I’ve tried holding the lock and volume down button. The blue LED light flashes a few times before it goes away. The phone has also vibrated every now and then.

I’m totally puzzled but this and it would be good if I could get some help :/

Thanks! — Rebecca

Solution: Hi Rebecca. Just like what we tell Emily, the problem is hardware in nature and no software troubleshooting or solution can fix your issue. The drop may have damaged the motherboard, or just the screen. Whatever the case is, you need the assistance of a professional to handle this thing for you. If there’s no Samsung store in your area, make sure to visit a local electronics shop so they can diagnose what the real issue is.

Problem #5: Galaxy Note 5 screen issue when phone is inactive

Hello DroidGuy. Lately, I’ve encountered a problem trying to add an emoji to a text message. I’m not sure if the problem is with the phone, some setting on the phone, or maybe something to do with the contact I’m trying to text, but if I click the little smiley icon on the Samsung keyboard layout, the color of the icon changes from white to yellow, but the screen showing available emoji’s doesn’t come up.

I’ve also started noticing that the screen freaks out when the screen is about to shut off due to inactivity. It blinks bright yellow, then goes darker or green, then the screen will shut off.

It also seems that my Yahoo mail account I have set up on the phone, doesn’t automatically update when I get a new mail message. If I open the mail app and refresh, new mail shows up, but after doing this manually, if I refresh again, I’ll see a few new e-mails, and after I go through them and read, delete, etc. if I refresh again, I sometimes get more new mail, even though I just refreshed a few seconds ago. Can you help? Thanks. — Jim

Solution: Hi Jim. It’s often difficult to determine the true cause of an issue or issues if we don’t know the full history of a device. We think though that a software overhaul won’t hurt at all if you try it first. Kindly do a factory reset first so you will see the difference. Here’s how it’s done:

  • Turn off your Samsung Galaxy Note 5 completely.
  • Press and hold the Volume Up and the Home buttons first, and then press and hold the Power key.
  • Keep the three buttons pressed and when ‘Samsung Galaxy Note5’ shows, release the Power key but continue holding the other two.
  • Once the Android logo shows, release both the Volume Up and Home buttons.
  • The notice ‘Installing system update’ will show on the screen for 30 to 60 seconds before the Android system recovery screen is shown with its options.
  • Use the Volume Down key to highlight the option ‘Yes — delete all user data’ and press the Power key to select it.
  • When the process is complete, use the Volume Down key to highlight the option ‘Reboot system now’ and hit the Power key to restart the phone.
  • The reboot may take a little longer to complete but don’t worry and wait for the device to become active.

The emoji problem you mentioned may be app-related. Make sure that you update the messaging app or keyboard you’re using to fix it. The rest should all be fixed by factory reset.

Problem #6: Galaxy Note 5 fingerprint scanner issue when charging

It often takes several attempts to get to the desktop from the screen being off and the phone locked. I put my thumb on the fingerprint scanner and it goes to yet another screen, where I have to simply swipe left or right to get to the desktop. 

The problem is, at this 2nd screen, the wallpaper registers my swipe, by simulating a ripple of water, but does not open to the desk top. I have to do this 2 or three more times.  

Also, if the phone is charging the fingerprint scanner feature is buggy. Sometimes it doesn’t respond.

Any of the above happen often, but not everytime. I have tried restarting my phone but that doesn’t seem to fix it. — Ron

Solution: Hi Ron. Just like what we tell Jim, make sure to do a factory reset first to ensure that there’s no firmware-level bug causing the problems.

For the fingerprint scanner issue, make sure that the Home button or scanner is clean by wiping it gently. Dirt or stuck prints can sometimes interfere with the reading causing errors. If the issue remains though, the problem might be due to a malfunctioning microUSB charging port. Have the phone replaced if the issue persists.

 


 

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If you are one of the users who encounters a problem with your device, let us know. We offer solutions for Android-related problems for free so if you have an issue with your Android device, simply fill in the short questionnaire in this link and we will try to publish our answers in the next posts. We cannot guarantee a quick response so if your issue is time sensitive, please find another way to resolve your problem. 

When describing your issue, please be as detailed as possible so we can easily pinpoint a relevant solution. If you can, kindly include the exact error messages you are getting to give us an idea where to start. If you have already tried some troubleshooting steps before emailing us, make sure to mention them so we can skip them in our answers.

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Apple to use Samsung’s OLED panels in upcoming iPhones?

Samsung Galaxy C7

Samsung Galaxy S7 - Snapdragon 820

As per a new report, Apple’s partnership with #Samsung for the supply of components could be strengthened over the years to come. It is being said that starting 2018, #Apple might be looking to get hold of their OLED panels for the iPhone models.

This would make the iPhone 8 the likely candidate to receive Samsung’s display technology, thus opening a new revenue stream for the Korean manufacturer and ultimately a better experience for Apple iPhone fans. The report was supposedly confirmed by a Samsung Display executive, who went on to mention that they’re currently in talks with Apple to put a deal in place.

Apple uses OLED displays only on the Apple Watch, with LG supplying the necessary display panels. However, there has been talk that Samsung might share some of the manufacturing duties in the days to come. This would ensure a smooth passage for the company to get involved with the iPhone display panels in the years to come.

However, we’re still taking this report with a pinch of salt as there’s no official confirmation coming from the companies yet.

Source: Korea Times

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ vs LG G4 – specs comparison

It’s becoming clearer and clearer by the day that Samsung’s “true” flagship for the upcoming holiday season was always meant to be the Galaxy S6 Edge+, not the Note 5. It’s of course no coincidence the latter is getting a more limited global bow, and even its freshly surfaced S Pen-related “design flaw” may have something to do with sloppier R&D.

samsung-galaxy-s6-edge-plus-vs-lg-g4

Many will argue you’re not supposed to insert the stylus the wrong way in its slot, and you deserve what’s coming if you don’t pay attention to the direction the tip is pointing at. But is it really as simple as that? Not if you consider such drama was impossible at previous Note generations and their non-springy pens. Physically impossible, as in prevented by design.

Anyhoo, this is not a piece about the Galaxy Note 5 for obvious reasons. It’s about the fully working, thoroughly well-designed and super-provocative Galaxy S6 Edge+. Also, its number one box-office opponent at the moment. That is, until the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus go on sale.

Galaxy Note 5 S6 Edge Plus

The LG G4’s curves are clearly subtler than its rival’s, and the hexa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 SoC is no match for the raw speed of the Exynos 7420. Can the leather-clad dark horse then still keep up with the metal-and-glass front-runner? Let’s find out:

Galaxy S6 Edge+ vs LG G4 – pricing and availability comparison

Up for grabs from all big four US carriers, Samsung’s “next big thing” is nowhere to be found on Amazon for the time being. At Best Buy, it’s bundled with a free wireless charger, which is neat, and can further net you $200 on a gift card with qualifying trade-ins.

Galaxy S6 Edge+

If you’d rather take your business directly to wireless service providers, Verizon is selling the edgy phablet starting at $32 a month, no upfront fee, or $768 outright. AT&T asks $47 extra off-contract, and also still does carrier agreements in exchange for $299.99.

Then there’s T-Mobile, where the 32GB 5.7 incher costs $780 at full retail, and finally, Sprint will give you a free Galaxy Tab 4 (on-contract) if you score the Galaxy S6 Edge+ with Lease programs or Easy Pay, i.e. $0 down. Alternatively, the Now Network wants $350 with pacts, or $792, no strings attached.

LG G4 brown

Quite the upscale purchase, no matter your retailer or operator choice, especially given an unlocked LG G4 is only $455 through Amazon. In brown leather, so none of that ceramicky or “metallic” plastic exterior nonsense. Of course, if you dig the non-leather gold or white models, they’re pretty affordable too, at $470 and $495 respectively.

Arguably the handsomest flavor is the leather black, available for $472 SIM-free, or $99.99 with Sprint or Verizon contracts. That’s one battle LG wins with ease, although it goes without saying the war remains wide open.

Design and build quality

Aesthetically speaking, this is very much an apples and oranges comparison. Which is not to say we can’t like one fruit more than the other. Can you guess which one? Of course you can. The scrumptious, stylish, robust, metal-and-glass dual-edged treat, measuring 154.4 x 75.8 x 6.9 mm and tipping the scales at 153 grams.

Galaxy-S6-edge-plus

Thanks to a slightly smaller screen and polycarbonate build, you’d expect the G4 to undercut the S6 Edge+’s weight, but that’s not really the case. Granted, the difference is negligible, as the leathery (or metallic) heavyweight contender weighs in at 155 grams.

At its thickest point (remember, the G4’s got a curve too), the 5.5 incher measures a fairly chunky 9.8 mm. And it’s also a bit wider than the GS6 Edge+, although shorter, courtesy of those now iconic physical buttons moved to the back.

LG G4

At the end of the day though, this is a crushing victory for the odds-on favorite. Ladies and gents, we have an exciting tie so far on our hands!

Display and cameras

5.7-inch Super AMOLED with 2,560 x 1,440 pixels and 518 ppi pixel density vs. 5.5-inch IPS LCD, 2,560 x 1,440 and 538 ppi respectively. Before you call this another tie, perhaps you’ll be interested to hear what DisplayMate had to say about the Quad HD panels on the Note 5 and S6 Edge+. Without going into too much detail, they’re “the best performing displays ever tested.” And that includes the G4.

lg-g4-camera

Now, cameras are a delicate subject to tackle for the moment, as we haven’t taken the photographic units of the S6 Edge+ for a real-life spin yet. On paper, the rear shooter should be as remarkable as the one on the G4, with 16 megapixels, optical image stabilization, autofocus and LED flash offered across the board.

Selfie addicts will likely find more comfort in the 8 megapixel front cam of the older flagship, as the new kid on the block only sports a 5 MP secondary camera.

Processor, RAM and battery life

This is where G4’s dreams of glory are completely smashed to pieces. We already showed you a series of Note 5 benchmarks, in which the S Pen phablet obliterated its predecessor, not to mention its Snapdragon 808-powered arch-nemesis.

Samsung 4 GB RAM

The S6 Edge+ features the same exact octa Exynos 7420 silicon, with a matching 4GB RAM for good measure. Ergo, expect a similar 30 to 35 percent gap in system performance, plus a noticeable advantage in energy efficiency for the S6 Edge+ also, despite its larger screen and identical 3,000 mAh battery.

A conclusive recent autonomy test put the Galaxy S6 Edge+ near the top of the charts, with 9 hours+ of single-charge endurance, whereas the LG G4 trailed way behind, at a modest 6 hours of so. Let’s not forget the new guy also comes with wired and wireless fast charging capabilities in tow, compared to wired only as far as the “veteran” is concerned.

Storage, software and others

What’s the score now? Five, six to one in favor of the S6 Edge+? Give another point to the G4 on account of microSD expansion. And a third one for the user-removable battery. Which still doesn’t make our verdict very hard to cast.

LG-G4-battery-microsd

Particularly when you add the touch-based fingerprint recognition technology of Samsung’s bad boy in the equation, as well as its arguably superior copy of Android 5.1 Lollipop. Proprietary UIs are mostly a matter of personal taste, but we think we speak for the vast majority of our readers when we say TouchWiz is prettier than Optimus 4.0.

Bloatware? Both phones are filled to the brim with non-Google apps, yet Samsung actually provides a few you’ll find use for. S-Voice, S Health, Kids Mode, plus a bunch of free “Galaxy Gifts” typically worth a good few hundred bucks.

Galaxy Gifts S6 Edge+

Connectivity-wise, neither device features a futuristic USB Type-C port, with LTE speeds slightly enhanced on the S6 Edge+, and Bluetooth 4.2 superseding 4.1. We have a clear winner therefore, and it’s exactly who you think.

Samsung Galaxy Note 5 has the best mobile display in the market: DisplayMate

Galaxy Note 5

Love it or hate it, but #Samsung as a company is unbeatable when it comes to mobile displays. Thanks to its range of #AMOLED display panels, the company has gained a lot of credit in the mobile industry. A new test conducted by DisplayMate has now concluded that the company’s new #GalaxyNote5 flagship has the best smartphone display in the industry, taking the reins from the #GalaxyNote4 which was the previous best.

A wide range of factors such as color gamut, display brightness, efficiency are taken into account in DisplayMate’s test, so we can safely say that this is coming from people who know what they’re talking about.

The folks over at DisplayMate said the following about the new Samsung flagship – “Based on our extensive Lab tests and measurements listed below, the Galaxy Note 5 is the Best performing Smartphone display that we have ever tested. It takes over from the Galaxy Note 4, which was the previous record holder for mobile display performance.”

The Galaxy Note 5 can be bought starting today from T-Mobile with other carriers expected to follow suit over the coming days.

Source: Display Mate

Via: Android Authority

Sony claims that it won’t bring Quad HD phones to the market just yet

Sony Logo

Sony isn’t exactly the world leader when it comes to smartphone sales as we’re all well aware. One of the prime reasons for its decline in the mobile industry is its refusal to adapt to the changing market conditions. We’ve seen this over a course of two years now where the company has barely made any changes to its flagship lineup.

And now, the company has gone on record to say that it’s not particularly keen on bringing Quad HD displays to its smartphones. The general manager of Sony Mobile Taiwan, Jonathan Lin, made the revelation. He gave away the information during an interview with a popular media outlet.

This makes sense from a technical standpoint as Quad HD displays barely make a difference as far as the display quality is concerned. Unless we’re talking about a big sized phone, Quad HD panels have the same amount of impact as 1080p smartphone displays. But given that the likes of Samsung, LG etc set the market trend, this might come as negative PR for Sony.

The company isn’t completely writing off Quad HD phones though, as they simply feel that the technology isn’t advanced enough as it stands. Maybe by next year we will finally see a Sony flagship with a 2K resolution display.

Do you agree with Sony and its concerns?

Source: Focus Taiwan

Samsung opening third screen manufacturing unit to cope up with the Galaxy S6 Edge demand

Galaxy S6 Edge

A new report suggests that Samsung is on its way towards opening a third display manufacturing unit in order to keep the demand for the Galaxy S6 Edge at bay. It seems like the company initially underestimated the kind of demand that the smartphone will see after launch, which explains this move to some extent.

It is said that this new manufacturing unit will allow Samsung to produce up to 5 million screens per month, significantly helping its cause. The company can only produce 2 million displays per month at the moment, so the addition of this new unit will help the company greatly.

Samsung had initially planned to get this factory up and running by June, but clearly, it can’t wait that long now as the demand seems to be soaring. The company has refused to divulge official sales figures of the two flagships, but by the looks of it, the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge have been doing pretty well so far.

Source: Bloomberg

Via: Android Authority

Sharp unveils 5.5 inch 4K resolution display

Sharp 4K Display

Sharp 4K Display

Japanese display manufacturer Sharp has just unveiled a new 5.5 inch UHD 4K resolution display meant for smartphones. This takes the pixel density race to a whole different level, providing an insane pixel density of 806 ppi. The panel will probably make its way to devices later this year, although the company hasn’t provided details on availability as of yet.

A 2K resolution display is currently the best one can find in terms of pixel density, but 4K will offer double the number of pixels. All those pixels will not be discernible to the human eye, making it a needless innovation in the mobile segment.

But needless to say, manufacturers will use this as a marketing ploy and hop on board right away. Prominent mobile players Samsung and LG who also have their own display units might be looking to up the ante as well. A recent rumor hinted that the Galaxy Note 5 from Samsung later this year will also feature the said display.

Do you welcome this news?

Source: TechBlog.gr – Translated

Via: Android Headlines

Samsung Galaxy S5 earns the “best performing smartphone display” title

Samsung Galaxy S5

Dr. Raymond M. Soneira of DisplayMate who is renowned for his expertise in analyzing displays down to every detail, has claimed that the Samsung Galaxy S5 has the “best performing smartphone display” he has ever tested. According to his report, Samsung has done a great job by focusing more on viewing angles and other areas of the display rather than merely increasing pixel count.

So even though the display resolution remains unchanged from the predecessor, it’s quite clear that Samsung has put in a lot of effort to improve other areas which require attention. This is where AMOLED displays really shine in comparison to standard LCDs and it is evident from Soneira’s report. It comes as no surprise really given Samsung’s long standing experience with AMOLED displays which has only gotten better with each passing year.

Will this report affect your opinion of the Galaxy S5 on the whole? Let us know in the comments section below.

Source: DisplayMate

Via: Droid-Life

OnePlus One to feature a 5.5 inch 1080p display with ‘Touch on Lens’ technology

OnePlus One

OnePlus One

The OnePlus One smartphone is expected to feature a bevy of top end hardware and we have more information to add to that list – the display. The company has now revealed that the smartphone will feature a 5.5 inch 1080p resolution display with something known as the ‘Touch On Lens’ technology. This will reportedly bridge the gap between the display and the touch sensor and provide 300% more durability compared to traditional displays.

This panel will be apparently made by Japan Display Inc, which consists of Hitachi, Sharp and Sony. The manufacturer claims that using QHD displays on smartphones is overkill and anything beyond 400 ppi is sufficient for any user out there.

Further, the company posted a teaser image with the smartphone hiding beneath the Sony Xperia Z1, with barely anything visible. This indicates that the smartphone will feature narrow bezels, which means that despite having a bigger screen than the Xperia Z1 (5.0 inches), it will almost fit into the same metal frame. This will give users more display real estate to play with and also increase efficiency.

OnePlus One

From what we know so far, the OnePlus One will also feature a quad core Snapdragon 800 SoC, a 3,100 mAh battery and come with a deeply customized version of Android with help from the CyanogenMod team. The pricing of the smartphone is reportedly going to be under $400 during launch.

Source: OnePlus Forums

Via: Phone Dog

How to Choose a Smartphone Guide: Display

How to Choose a Smartphone Guide Display

How to Choose a Smartphone Guide Display

After talking about processors and storage options, we will now discuss Smartphone display. The display is another important aspect of a Smartphone since this serves as its input as well as an output device.

Among the things that we will talk about in this part is the display size, resolution, PPI and several display technologies available today.

Related Articles

This is a part of the following series of articles:

which will provide you ways to understand the jargons associated with the technical specifications of Smartphones. It is highly advised that you read all of these in order for you to be able to come up with your ideal Smartphone.

Display Size

One of the important things that you should consider when choosing a Smartphone is its display size because it affects how you will be able to view the visual elements of the device. Display size is measured diagonally and the unit of measurement used for it is inches.

Generally, the display size of Smartphones is between 3.5 inches up to 5.3 inches. It should be noted though that a Smartphone that has a measurement of more than 5 inches up to 6.9 inches is technically a “phablet”, which connotes a device that is a hybrid of a smartphone and a tablet. However, most companies still use the term “Smartphone” to refer to such devices.

Display Resolution

The next factor that you should look into is the display resolution because it determines the actual working space available in the screen of your Smartphone. Basically, it is the maximum number of distinct pixels that each dimension of the screen can display. Thus, a display resolution is indicated in “pixels” (abbreviated as “px”). So, for example, if it says “1280 x 800 px”, that means the unit of pixels in its width is 1280 while the height has 800 pixels.

PPI

The acronym ppi means “pixel per inch”, which is also known as the pixel density. The quality of the display of the device is dependent on how high is its ppi.

The ppi is derived using the formula “ppi = {[(display width in pixel)^2 + (display height in pixel)^2] ^ ½} / Display Size in inches”. But there’s no need to memorize or perform this calculation because many Smartphone manufacturers include this in the technical specifications of a Smartphone.

Types of Display Technologies

Currently, there are four types of display technologies available for Smartphones. These are:

1. LCD

LCD stands for liquid-crystal display. This is the most basic among the different types of display technologies available for smartphones today. It utilizes the light modulating properties of liquid crystals to produce images.

Most computing devices use this kind of display because it has lesser contrast, brightness, color and it is more power efficient.

2. LCD IPS                                  

This is just a slightly enhanced version of LCD. IPS means In-Plane Switching which provides better viewing angle and more advanced color accuracy than the former. So far, this is the most common type of display used in smartphones. Notable phones that use this kind of technology are the iPhone 4S and iPhone 5.

3. LED

LED means light-emitting diode. This type of display, as its name implies, uses light-emitting diodes to produce visual images. Compared to LED, it has less power consumption.

4. AMOLED

Overall, this is the best among the types of displays mentioned because of its capability to produce images that have high contrast, brightness and color accuracy. However, due to its high-end performance, it utilizes more power. An example of a phone that uses this is the Samsung Galaxy S4.

Trade-Offs

A bigger display size usually results to a larger overall measurement of a smartphone. This compromises the user’s ability to store it in his pocket conveniently or carry it around easily.

Also, if the display size is big but the display resolution is very low, the images in the phone will not be very crisp or they will appear pixelated. In addition, you will not be able to enjoy HD multimedia content if your display resolution is too low.

On the other hand, if your display size is too small but you have a very high resolution, the images in your screen will appear very detailed but the problem is they will be too small. This will sometimes give you trouble in selecting closely-placed icons when you have huge fingers because there is a big chance that you will be accidently touching another as well.

Display Protection

Another important factor to consider when choosing a display is its protection and touch sensitivity. The most popular material used for display protection nowadays is the Corning Gorilla Glass which is highly resistant to scratches.

Presently, majority of smartphones offer capacitive touch screens with multi-touch. According to manufacturers, this can recognize the action of up to 10 fingers that are simultaneously touching the display of the device. It should be noted that when choosing a phone, it should be capable of detecting at least two different touches.

More Articles on How to Choose a Smartphone

The next that will be discussed is connectivity, which lets the smartphone connect to various carriers or network providers.

Reader Question: What’s the Right Size for a Smartphone?

tabletphone

Smartphones these days are an integral part of our lives and do a lot more than just answering calls or sending text messages. There are plenty of activities we can do with a smartphone like assigning appointments, setting reminders, and basically do anything a computer can do albeit with a slightly cumbersome display to see things. So basically, it is almost impossible to even imagine our lives without smartphones.

How It All Began

With the kind of evolution we’re seeing in the smartphone industry in general, it is inevitable that some of the manufacturers will try to bring something new to the fore which hasn’t been tried before. There was a time when a 3.5-inch display panel was considered big enough for a smartphone. But today, the benchmark has been raised substantially and we’re seeing smartphones packing 5.5-inch displays, which is enormous in every sense of the word. But the thing about us humans is that we get used to it very quickly and immediately ignore the fact that it’s too large, which is a good thing. But is there really a perfect size for a smartphone? The one which isn’t too big, nor too small to handle? Well, it’s pretty easy to just say something like that, but do we know which is perfect and which isn’t? This to be honest is a very subjective issue and one which cannot have an easy conclusion. For an Average Joe, the perfect smartphone would be the one that fits perfectly in his palm and lets him do all the operations with relative ease. In my opinion, any smartphone which lets the user operate it with one hand can be considered an ideal size for a smartphone. I know a few of the Galaxy Note/Note II owners would have some harsh things to say about that, but as I said, it’s highly subjective. I’m personally not open to the idea of using a smartphone with two hands, because that’s clearly not how it was intended to be. This is not to say that a smartphone should be too small either. I’ve personally hated the size of the iPhone which is probably too small for watching videos and playing content, but Apple changed that with the iPhone 5. Not that it’s any bigger now.

The Current Smartphones

We have smartphones like the Samsung Galaxy S III and the HTC One X which are quite too large for an average user but are still pretty usable with one hand. The moment you use two hands to handle or even hold a device, then you know you’ve got yourself a tablet and not a smartphone. The Galaxy Note in my opinion strikes a perfect balance of size and weight, but although it’s pretty easy to handle, it can be a tad too large sometimes. Especially when the phone is held against the ear. Back in the day, people would usually get plenty of stares for carrying a phone that large, but with the popularity of the device, people have gotten accustomed to it. However, when we hear of devices like the Galaxy Note 8, we just wonder if there’s no bar or threshold for a smartphone’s display. The Galaxy Note is awkward to hold against the ear as it is, and manufacturers just don’t want to stop. Having said that, I’m sure there’s a market for these smartphones too, so I’m waiting to see the Galaxy Note 8 in real before actually passing judgment.

Smartphones like the Galaxy S III strike a perfect balance of height, weight and width and is ideal for easy operation. The fact of the matter is that our tastes change every year, depending on what the manufacturers come up with by then. Perhaps one day we can stop and say, yes this is the perfect size for a smartphone. But alas, that day isn’t even close to coming near yet. Until then, we can merely bask in the glory of smartphones that surround us 24×7.

What’s the ideal size of a smartphone according to you? Sound off below or drop us a line at – [email protected].

Reader Question: What’s the Right Size for a Smartphone?

tabletphone

Smartphones these days are an integral part of our lives and do a lot more than just answering calls or sending text messages. There are plenty of activities we can do with a smartphone like assigning appointments, setting reminders, and basically do anything a computer can do albeit with a slightly cumbersome display to see things. So basically, it is almost impossible to even imagine our lives without smartphones.

How It All Began

With the kind of evolution we’re seeing in the smartphone industry in general, it is inevitable that some of the manufacturers will try to bring something new to the fore which hasn’t been tried before. There was a time when a 3.5-inch display panel was considered big enough for a smartphone. But today, the benchmark has been raised substantially and we’re seeing smartphones packing 5.5-inch displays, which is enormous in every sense of the word. But the thing about us humans is that we get used to it very quickly and immediately ignore the fact that it’s too large, which is a good thing. But is there really a perfect size for a smartphone? The one which isn’t too big, nor too small to handle? Well, it’s pretty easy to just say something like that, but do we know which is perfect and which isn’t? This to be honest is a very subjective issue and one which cannot have an easy conclusion. For an Average Joe, the perfect smartphone would be the one that fits perfectly in his palm and lets him do all the operations with relative ease. In my opinion, any smartphone which lets the user operate it with one hand can be considered an ideal size for a smartphone. I know a few of the Galaxy Note/Note II owners would have some harsh things to say about that, but as I said, it’s highly subjective. I’m personally not open to the idea of using a smartphone with two hands, because that’s clearly not how it was intended to be. This is not to say that a smartphone should be too small either. I’ve personally hated the size of the iPhone which is probably too small for watching videos and playing content, but Apple changed that with the iPhone 5. Not that it’s any bigger now.

The Current Smartphones

We have smartphones like the Samsung Galaxy S III and the HTC One X which are quite too large for an average user but are still pretty usable with one hand. The moment you use two hands to handle or even hold a device, then you know you’ve got yourself a tablet and not a smartphone. The Galaxy Note in my opinion strikes a perfect balance of size and weight, but although it’s pretty easy to handle, it can be a tad too large sometimes. Especially when the phone is held against the ear. Back in the day, people would usually get plenty of stares for carrying a phone that large, but with the popularity of the device, people have gotten accustomed to it. However, when we hear of devices like the Galaxy Note 8, we just wonder if there’s no bar or threshold for a smartphone’s display. The Galaxy Note is awkward to hold against the ear as it is, and manufacturers just don’t want to stop. Having said that, I’m sure there’s a market for these smartphones too, so I’m waiting to see the Galaxy Note 8 in real before actually passing judgment.

Smartphones like the Galaxy S III strike a perfect balance of height, weight and width and is ideal for easy operation. The fact of the matter is that our tastes change every year, depending on what the manufacturers come up with by then. Perhaps one day we can stop and say, yes this is the perfect size for a smartphone. But alas, that day isn’t even close to coming near yet. Until then, we can merely bask in the glory of smartphones that surround us 24×7.

What’s the ideal size of a smartphone according to you? Sound off below or drop us a line at – [email protected].