American Airlines to Start Using Google Assistant’s Interpreter Mode at Select Locations

With Google Assistant touching 500 million active users per month, American Airlines has announced that it will start using Google Nest smart displays with Assistant and Interpreter Mode to assist non-English speaking travelers in its lounges.

American Airlines’ Chief Information Officer, Maya Leibman said, “The science-fiction universal translator is now science fact. Incorporating technology like the Google Assistant’s interpreter mode will help us break down barriers, provide a worry-free travel experience, and make travel more accessible to all.”

Unfortunately, American Airlines hasn’t specified the airports that will see the addition of interpreter modes nor did the airline mention if it’s planning a wider rollout globally. For now, this translation service will only be available at the Los Angeles International Airport. The airline carrier adds that this service will only be available when no staff is present to assist the travelers, so you may not find it everywhere. Also, interpreter mode is currently supported in 29 languages (including English) listed below:

  • Arabic
  • Bengali
  • Burmese
  • Cambodian (also called Khmer)
  • Czech
  • Danish
  • Dutch
  • English
  • Estonian
  • Filipino (Tagalog)
  • Finnish
  • French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Gujarati
  • Hindi
  • Hungarian
  • Indonesian
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Javanese
  • Kannada
  • Korean
  • Malayalam
  • Marathi
  • Nepali
  • Mandarin
  • Norwegian
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Romanian
  • Russian
  • Sinhala
  • Slovak
  • Spanish
  • Sudanese
  • Swedish
  • Tamil
  • Telugu
  • Thai
  • Turkish
  • Ukrainian
  • Urdu
  • Vietnamese

As you can see, the list is quite elaborate and includes a wide number of languages, although it’s still not complete for a global rollout. However, this is certainly a great start and should hopefully pave the way for more airlines and other sectors to follow suit. Have you tried interpreter mode on Google Assistant? What do you make of it?

Via: TechCrunch