Archives for

browsing

Samsung Galaxy S5 vs iPhone 5s vs Sony Xperia Z2 – Benchmark Comparison

Though Samsung never really acknowledged it did anything wrong vis-à-vis artificially boosting benchmarks in the past, last week brought the surprising and refreshing news of sneaky code being removed from Galaxy devices with Android 4.4 KitKat upgrades.

iPhone 5s Xperia Z2 Galaxy S5

Technically, this should greatly increase the credibility of “synthetic tests” on Samsung-made Android gadgets, as well as for the entire ecosystem, albeit truth be told, benchmark scores are never to be taken excessively seriously, regardless of their theoretical accuracy.

Remember, everyone, it’s all very abstract, in theory, on paper. As such, especially when dealing with minuscule gaps, you’re unlikely to notice them in real life. Oftentimes, rankings are overturned, due to certain optimizations that performance-measuring software can’t possibly evaluate.

Bottom line, yes, benchmark scores can still be misleading, deceiving, confusing. But right now, they’re a tad more credible than a week ago. So here we are, ready to pit the spanking new Samsung Galaxy S5 against the equally as fresh Sony Xperia Z2 and mighty but aging Apple iPhone 5s. It’s all in good fun, yet it may also answer a few key controversies.

samsung-galaxy-s5-vs-apple-iphone-5s

Is the GS5 truly “more of the same”? At least as far as its raw speed is concerned. Does Sony have a shot at the mobile gold medal this year? Should Apple hurry up with iPhone 6 development, or is the 5s in a position to fend off up-and-coming rivals despite its age? Let’s see.

GFX Bench 2.7 1080p T-Rex Offscreen

Sony Xperia Z2 – 27.7 fps

Galaxy S5 – 27.2

iPhone 5s – 26.2

Galaxy S5 GFX Bench

Since we’re looking at a graphics reviewer and both the GS5 and Z2 pack the same exact GPU – Adreno 330 – we expected very close, maybe even identical scores. And that’s exactly what we got. Yet there is a small gap here, and it’s quite puzzling, as if anything, we anticipated the S5 would come out on top, thanks to its higher-clocked 2.5 GHz Snapdragon 801 chip.

The iPhone 5s? It’s not far behind, but it’s starting to struggle. And mind you, GFX Bench is a lot more reliable than, say, AnTuTu, as well as nearly impossible to game.

GFX Bench 3.0 1080p Manhattan Offscreen

Galaxy S5 – 11.6 fps

iPhone 5s – 10.9

Sony Xperia Z2 – 10.1

iPhone 5s GFX Bench

Okay, this is confusing. Though the two GFX tests gauge performance from the same standpoint, graphics, their findings are anything but conclusive or stable. What’s up with that? To be perfectly honest, I have no idea.

What’s obvious is the three beasts are neck and neck, so I’ll avoid naming an overall winner. Oh, alright, if you insist, the S5 seems to (barely) edge out its opponents.

SunSpider (lower is better)

Galaxy S5 – 408 ms

iPhone 5s – 415

Sony Xperia Z2 – 952

Oh, wow, Sony, you really screwed the pooch in browser performance, which is much more important than graphics for many mobile users. Well, it looks like it, but I wouldn’t jump to conclusions just yet. Unlike the GFX Bench results, which came from the horse’s mouth, S5 and Z2’s Sunspider marks were reported in preliminary hands-on previews at Barcelona’s MWC.

Not only were there too few to grade them trustworthy, they likely counted on pre-release prototypes. Probably, a highly advanced S5 prototype and a much clunkier Z2 variant. So no, I don’t think Sony’s big guy will be quite as laggy once it officially rolls out. Meanwhile, the S5 is ready to overtake the iPhone 5s in essentially the latter’s best benchmark, so kudos Samsung.

Basemark X

iPhone 5s – 1,015 points average; 20,220 in Basemark X 1.1 Medium

Galaxy S5 – 986 average, 23,501 in Basemark X 1.1

Sony Xperia Z2 – 25,172 in Basemark X 1.1

iPhone 5s Basemark

Rightware’s otherwise conclusive and reliable database lacks the Z2 at the moment, so its mind-blowing Basemark X 1.1 score is preliminary and undependable. Which is not what we can say about the iPhone and S5. Only their results are fairly muddy and confusing.

Overall, as you can see on Rightware’s homepage, the iPhone 5s is the fourth best phone in the world, behind the Asus PadFone Infinity 2 (?), Pantech Vega Secret Note (?!), and Nexus 5 (?!?), but ahead of the S5.

Galaxy S5 Basemark

Break it up by chapters though, and Apple isn’t leading Samsung by a very comfortable margin. In fact, the two each put a couple in the win column, in system and web speed and memory and graphics respectively, so in a way, they’re tied.

3DMark Ice Storm

Samsung Galaxy S5 – 18,438

iPhone 5s – 14,000

Samsung-Galaxy-S5-iPhone-5S

Let’s not beat it around the bush anymore. Galaxy S5’s Adreno 330 GPU, aided by the quad-core Snapdragon 801 chip and possibly software optimizations, trumps iPhone’s PowerVR G6430. Ice Storm proves it, as does GFX Bench and even Basemark. So if you want rich, outstanding graphics, the “next big thing” is your guy.

Or maybe it’s Sony’s Xperia Z2, not yet rated in Ice Storm, not fully evaluated in Basemark but looking pretty close to the S5 in GFX Bench.

AnTuTu

Galaxy S5 – 35,500 points

Xperia Z2 – 35,000

Ah, the infamous, notorious AnTuTu! Always dodged by Cupertino, but embraced by all Android OEMs as it’s one of very few tools around focusing on more than a couple of aspects. Sure, it’s extremely easy to trick, but assuming the shenanigans are over, let’s remember it rounds up CPU, RAM, GPU and I/O (input/output) performance for one big score.

Predictably enough, there’s little to choose between our two flagships, as the S5 rocks the ever so slightly zippier processor, whereas the Z2 packs an extra gig of RAM. The GPUs are identical, so there you have it: two overall cutting-edge slabs of silicon.

Quadrant

Galaxy S5 – 23,400 points

Xperia Z2 – 17,600

Xperia Z2 Quadrant

Another benchmark ignored by Apple and its fans, Quadrant is a little more dependable than AnTuTu, but not as comprehensive. It focuses on CPU, I/O and 3D graphics, leaving RAM aside, and like Sunspider, it shows that there might be something very wrong with Z2’s on-board software.

Either that, or there was something wrong at one point during the manufacturing process, because once again, the tests may have been executed on unfinished, glitchy devices. Regardless of how the Xperia Z2 will end up performing, the S5 is undoubtedly hard to beat. Almost impossible, which puts a few things into perspective.

For instance, should we still care the phone’s rear is as ugly as sin? Can we continue to bitch and moan Samsung didn’t truly upgrade the Galaxy S4 when it’s clear the S5 is the fastest smartphone in the world? Let us know what you think in the comments section below.

Sources: GFX Bench, GSM Arena, Phone Arena, Rightware, Expert Reviews, YouTube, PC Mag, Anandtech 

iPhone 5s vs Galaxy Note 3 vs LG G2 vs Sony Xperia Z1 – Benchmark Comparison, Take One

If it’s not obvious already, you’re on an Android blog. And you’re reading the words of a relentless, unapologetic (wink, wink) Android aficionado. But that doesn’t mean I, as well as everyone here at The Droid Guy, don’t like to keep an open mind and just discard everything that doesn’t run Google’s silky smooth mobile OS.

android-vs-apple

So as hard as it might be for you to believe, I’m willing to give Apple’s new iPhone 5s a chance to divert my attention away from such jewels as Samsung’s Galaxy S4 and Note 3, LG’s G2 or Sony’s Xperia Z Ultra and Z1.

Sure, their newest best thing is tiny, sports a display that’s crammed and low-res and a rear-facing camera that on paper can’t hold a candle to Z1’s stupendous 20 MP snapper. But maybe Apple’s seemingly gimmicky 64-bit A7 CPU can turn things around for the iPhone 5S and make it such a powerhouse that all the flaws will pale in comparison.

Still, with the new iPhone only available for a few days and the GNote 3 or Xperia Z1 mostly unavailable around the world, we’ll have to give it some extra time until thorough enough reviews and benchmark tests will be performed to prove beyond the shadow of a doubt which of the three is the numero uno smartphone out there in terms of raw speed.

galaxy-note-3-vs-iphone-5s

For now, we’ll have to settle with just bits and pieces, which are very important, mind you, but not 100% conclusive. Here goes the first part of the iPhone 5s vs Note 3 vs Xperia Z1 vs LG G2 ultimate benchmark smackdown.

SunSpider (lower is better)

iPhone 5S: 416 milliseconds

Galaxy Note 3: 650 ms

Xperia Z1: 830

LG G2: 900

iphone-5s

In lack of iPhone 5s scores in popular benchmarking tools such as AnTuTu, Vellamo or Quadrant, we have to start the festivities with SunSpider, a test of browsing muscle. Probably unsurprising, Apple’s big guy puts one in the win column quite comfortably here, due to both its road-opening (we can’t deny them that) 64-bit processor and very particular software optimizations.

While the LG G2 and Xperia Z1 are clearly no competition for the 5s, we have to underline Note 3’s score came by way of a pre-release prototype’s test, meaning the commercial unit will likely get much closer to the iPhone. Then again, it’s unlikely to beat it, so point Apple.

Geekbench 3.0

Xperia Z1: 2,800 points

iPhone 5s: 2,500

LG G2: 2,100

Galaxy S4 Octa: 2,000

Sony Xperia Z1

Well, well, well, guess what, not all browser benchmarks are so kind to the new iPhone. Granted, the 2,500 score is pretty darn impressive, but since Geekbench theoretically relies more than anything on CPU performance, it should be pretty disappointing (for them, certainly not for us) to see Z1’s Snapdragon 800, a 32-bit SoC, kick A7’s ass. And by so much!

Meanwhile, the GNote 3 is yet to be taken through the Geekbench hoops, so I took the liberty to add the octa-core variant of the GS4 in the mix for comparison purposes. And true, this thing has nothing on the 5s. But a 500-point edge for a device released six months after its adversary is certainly not that remarkable, is it?

GFXBench 2.7 T-Rex HD offscreen and onscreen

iPhone 5s: 24.7 Fps and 37.4

Galaxy S4 LTE-A: 26.4 Fps and 26.5

Xperia Z1: 22.9 Fps and 24.1

LG G2: 21.8 Fps and 23.0

iPhone 5s GFX

The iPhone 5s takes this battle and is now two for three, which we have to admit is a very nice record. But it’s also not a conclusive one, since the Note 3 is once again missing the battle. Meanwhile, the LTE-Advanced flavor of the Galaxy S4 actually puts up a decent fight against the 5s, defeating it in the off-screen chapter of this very thorough GPU benchmark test, but being subsequently put to shame onscreen.

What does that tell us? Intriguingly, that the biggest iPhone 5s selling point in the performance department might not be the CPU after all, but instead the graphics processing unit. Or so it seems.

3DMark Unlimited – Ice Storm

Galaxy S4 LTE-A – 17,000 points

Xperia Z1 – 16,800

LG G2 – 15,400

iPhone 5s – 14,000

samsung-galax-s4-lte-a

Now this is embarrassing. And I won’t even try to contain or hide my delight. How could I? I mean, the iPhone 5s came dead last in a competition based on a very meticulous and trustworthy test, which essentially measures how the CPU and GPU work together towards an only goal.

And once again, the Note 3 is yet to have its performance tested. Can you imagine how much Samsung’s 5.7-incher will change the ranks both here and in Geekbench and GFX Bench? I can and I tell you, it won’t look pretty for Apple.

But let’s back up for a second and look at the Ice Storm scores one more time. Something there that draws your attention? A shocker, maybe? Well, yeah, the Korean-only LTE-A GS4 comes out on top, defeating Apple’s “big” guy by an incredible margin of 3,000 points. With the risk of repeating myself, that… is… really… embarrassing.

Early conclusions

That’s a wrap, kind gentlemen and lovely ladies, but be sure to look through the source links below for more benchmarks, mostly starring the iPhone 5s. And remember, all the above is just a sample of the much too complex and complicated smackdown between the best smartphones of today.

iphone_5s_64_bit

Also, it’s too early for verdicts. Granted, the 5s looks mighty strong from a number of standpoints. But at the same time, given all that 64-bit hoopla, the world expected more. Did you? Is anyone really, truly, seriously considering jumping ship from Android to iOS? And if so, are you sure you don’t need a checkup?

Sources: Anandtech, Gizmodo, GFX Bench, Appadvice, PC Mag, YouTube, Tbreak, GSM Arena