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What to do about the Samsung Galaxy S8 that cannot detect the new SD card [Troubleshooting Guide]

We have some readers who contacted us because their new phone cannot detect or read the SD card they inserted. Typically, this problem is very easy to fix and as long as your phone hasn’t been physically damaged or had its firmware modified, you can rest assured the problem is with the SD card and not with the phone.

In this post, we will try to look into this problem with the Samsung Galaxy S8 being the subject of our troubleshooting. The very first thing we will have to do is to look for signs of both liquid and physical damages and once we can verify that this problem isn’t caused by them, we’ll proceed with our practical troubleshooting. So, if you are one of the owners of this phone and are currently bugged by a similar problem, continue reading as this post may help you.

Should you have other issues with your phone, feel free to visit our Galaxy S8 troubleshooting page for we have already addressed a lot of problems before and odds are that there could already be issues that are similar with yours. If you need further assistance, fill up our Android issues questionnaire and hit submit to contact us.

Troubleshooting SD Card that can’t be detected by Galaxy S8


This troubleshooting guide will be centered on making sure it’s not an issue with the phone but we will also be giving you some pointers on how to thoroughly check the SD card itself. We don’t suggest things that can potentially damage your phone or its accessories so you can rest assured that this troubleshooting guide will be safe yet effective.

Verify the problem is not due to physical or liquid damage

Determining physical damage is easy as there should be visible dents or scratches if the phone was dropped or got hit by something hard. If you tried removing its covers and then this problem started, it should also be a sign of a physical damage. Depending on your expertise, you may try fixing the problem by undoing what you did with your phone if possible.

As to the possibility that this is due to liquid damage, the best thing you could do is check the USB port and the liquid damage indicator itself. Look into the  charging port to see if there is trace of moisture or if it’s wet. If it is, then use a cotton swab to clean around the area or insert a small piece of tissue to absorb the moist.

To check the liquid damage indicator, remove the SIM card tray and look into the slot. Look for the small sticker which would tell you if liquid has entered your phone. If the sticker is still white, then the device is free from liquid damage but it’s a different story if it turned red, pink or purple.

Should there be signs of physical or liquid damage, the best thing you could do is bring the phone to the shop and let the tech handle the problem for you.

Test the SD Card with other devices

It’s simple. If the SD card work with other devices, then the problem is with your phone but it doesn’t mean it’s serious. However, if the SD card doesn’t work with other devices as well, then it’s clear that the issue is with it and there’s a whole bunch of other possibilities that we have to consider.

But assuming it works with other devices, here’s what I suggest  you do with your phone:

  • Run it in Safe mode but make sure the SD card is properly mounted. Access your files from the card to see if you can, if you can’t, then move on to the next procedure.
  • Make sure it’s virtually mounted on your phone. For the SD card to work, it should be physically and virtually mounted in your phone. Go to the Settings > Storage and see if it’s mounted.
  • Make sure the SD card is compatible with your device. There’s a small percentage of SD cards that aren’t compatible with certain models of phones. Refer to the user guide or packaging label to know more about the SD card or contact the store where you bought it.
  • Reset your phone and see if it works. Assuming the card is compatible with your phone but it still fails to read it, then let’s rule out the possibility that your phone’s settings have been messed up. Backup your important files and data and then reset your phone to see if it can read the card after that.

Things you should do if the SD card can’t be detected by other devices

You will only have to do these things if the SD card doesn’t work well with your S8 and other devices. Go through the list and see if one of them works…

  • Let your laptop read it. If possible, get an SD card adapter and then let the computer or your laptop read it. Computers can easily read external storage devices even if they have issues.
  • Format the SD card using a computer. Regardless whether your laptop can read the SD card or not, try to reformat it. This is the best solution if the card got corrupt for some reason. Of course, if your computer can read it, grab that opportunity to make a backup of your important files.
  • Mount the SD card back on your phone. After you’ve reformatted the card, it’s time to try it on your phone to see if the format process did help.
  • Buy a new one. After doing all these things and the SD card is still unreadable by your devices, then it’s time to get a new one. If you just bought it, you better bring it back to the store and have it replaced.

SD cards are often subject to corruption especially if your device randomly restarts. The first time you’re getting an error when trying to access files from the storage device, do your best to make a backup of your important files and data so that you won’t lose them if things go south.

I hope that this troubleshooting guide can help you fix a problem or two with your phone. If you need further assistance, we’re always willing to help you. Feel free to contact us anytime.

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How to fix Samsung Galaxy S8 Plus moisture detected problem?

Despite the fact that your Samsung Galaxy S8+ is dust and liquid resistant, you may still be bugged by problems caused by water every now and then and the most common would be the warning “moisture detected” which basically tells you the charger/USB port is wet.

When this problem occurs, it is almost certain that it’s due to water or any sort of liquid. However, there’s also a possibility that the error is triggered by some issues in the firmware especially if the problem started shortly after a firmware update. There were reports from some of our readers that suggest this problem might also be due to a bad update.

Regardless whether the warning is due to liquid or a firmware issue, your phone won’t charge and that’s what this problem is all about; charging is disrupted. The worse thing is you may notice your S8 Plus to be having this issue when its battery is almost drained out.

Continue reading below to know more about this problem and how to fix it. If you have other issue however, drop by our S8 Plus troubleshooting page or fill up our Android issues questionnaire and hit submit to contact us. We will be more than willing to help you with your problem.

Troubleshooting Galaxy S8+ with moisture detected problem

The course of our troubleshooting will be to make sure your phone isn’t suffering from liquid damage. Doing so will give us a clearer perspective on how serious the problem is as well as prevent more problems from happening if it’s indeed due to water damage. With all that being said, here are the things you need to do about this…

Check your phone for possible liquid damage

The first thing you have to do of course, is check the USB port to know if there’s indeed some traces of moisture in there. You may blow into the port to clean it out and get rid of debris and link if any. You may also use a cotton swab to clean around the area or insert a small piece of tissue paper to absorb the moist. Doing these things will immediately address the “moisture detected” warning you’re getting. You may then try to charge your phone to see if the warning still pops up.

In light to making sure it’s not liquid damage, you better check the Liquid Damage Indicator. Remove the SIM card tray and look into the SIM slot to find a small sticker that may tell you if your phone is suffering from liquid damage. If the indicator remains white, it means it’s not tripped and liquid damage is unlikely. However, it’s a different story if the indicator turned pink, purple or red. If this is the case, you have to bring the phone to the shop to be checked.

Turn off your phone and charge

As I said earlier, the immediate result of the “moisture detected” warning is not charging. I understand you may already have little juice left and you need your phone to charge so you can continue using and troubleshooting it. This procedure will be the first method you could use to bypass the warning.

Just turn your phone off and then charge it. Remember, the warning typically shows up when the phone is powered up while charging. Depending on how serious the problem is, you may be able to fully charge your phone while it’s powered down.

Restart your phone in Safe mode and charge

This is also another way of bypassing the warning and this is based on the suggestions of some of our readers who’ve encountered this problem. According to them, even if the warning pops up, you will still be able to continue charging your phone in safe mode. In this environment, the phone is running in its bare bones and charging may be possible. Here’s how you boot your S8+ in safe mode:

  1. Turn the device off.
  2. Press and hold the Power key past the model name screen.
  3. When “SAMSUNG” appears on the screen, release the Power key.
  4. Immediately after releasing the Power key, press and hold the Volume down key.
  5. Continue to hold the Volume down key until the device finishes restarting.
  6. Safe mode will display in the bottom left corner of the screen.
  7. Release the Volume down key when you see Safe Mode.

Make use of wireless charging

This isn’t really a fix but a workaround. So, assuming you really cannot charge your phone using its wired charger and you badly need to use it but it’s already running out of juice, then place it on top of the wireless charger. The warning won’t show up when you’re using a wireless charger as electricity doesn’t pass through the USB port.

Well of course, you need to borrow from a friend or buy a new wireless charger to be able to make use of this method. That is if you know for sure your phone hasn’t touched liquid but bugged by the moisture detected warning every time you plug it in to charge.

Clear data of USB Settings service

The moisture detected warning pops up when the USB Settings service detects moisture in the port. It may also trigger the warning if there’s a glitch in the system that disrupts the normal operation of the phone. Needless to say, resetting the service that handles the warning will prevent it from popping up but you should know this is a temporary solution and it’s just a matter of time before the warning would pop up again. But at least, you can give your device time to replenish its battery especially if you badly need to use your phone:

  1. From the Home screen, swipe up on an empty spot to open the Apps tray.
  2. Tap Settings > Apps.
  3. Find and touch USB Settings.
  4. Tap Storage.
  5. Tap Clear data and then tap OK.

So, there you have it! These are the things you can do to make your phone charge its battery even if it’s bugged by the “moisture detected” warning. If by any chance you’re not sure if your phone is suffering from liquid damage, it’s better to bring it back to the shop so that tech can do tests that will determine the problem.

I hope this troubleshooting guide can help you one way or the other.

How to fix Samsung Galaxy A7 black screen of death issue [Troubleshooting Guide]

Some of our readers who own the Samsung Galaxy A7 have contacted us regarding the so-called black screen of death. This problem is often characterized by a black and unresponsive screen, hence the name. It leaves an impression that the phone is powered down and won’t turn on but more often, the device is actually powered on but still not responsive.

There is however, one characteristic that you immediately have to look into to know how serious the problem could be and that would be the LED indicator. There are BSOD cases wherein the phone would flash a blue light at the top of the screen as if the phone has some unread notifications or messages. There are also cases wherein it’s just the black screen and no other. I will briefly explain the difference between these two.

Before we proceed, if you are looking for a solution to a different problem, visit our Galaxy A7 troubleshooting page for we have already addressed some of the most common issues with this phone. If even you need more help from us, then feel free to contact us by filling up this form.

Troubleshooting Galaxy A7 with black screen of death

If your phone has a black screen and there’s a blue light that keeps flashing at the top of the screen, it’s more likely just a system crash. Fortunately, this problem can easily be fixed. However, if it’s all just black screen and there are no other signs of life, then you might be dealing with a power-related issue, which is a bit more complicated to fix. Regardless what the case maybe, here’s what I suggest you do about it…

Perform the Forced Restart procedure

It is imperative that you begin your troubleshooting with this procedure. It’s very easy and safe to do yet very effective in dealing with issues that have something to do with the firmware. In case you don’t know yet, system crashes happen more often than you think and the black screen of death is often the most common symptom of this problem.

When it happens, your phone won’t respond to whatever you do with it. A few years ago, we usually just pull the battery out to “power shock” the phone but that’s not possible now since your Galaxy A7 doesn’t have a removable battery. There’s a procedure that offers the same effect and that’s the Forced Restart; you just got to press and hold both the volume down and the power keys together for 10 seconds and your device may reboot normally. That’s the end of the problem and you haven’t lost anything from your phone.

Try charging your phone

If the Forced Restart procedure failed to bring the phone back to life, then the next thing you must do is make sure there’s enough battery to power up all your phone’s components. Plug the AC adapter to a working wall outlet and then connect your phone using the original USB cable. I would assume you’re using the original charger and cable that came with the main unit.

Aside from ruling out the possibility that your phone has just drained its battery, charging your device will also give you a clearer perspective if it’s suffering from a serious hardware problem because if so, your phone may fail to charge.

Usually, when you plug the charger in, your phone would show on its screen the charging icon and the LED indicator may light up. If none of these charging signs show, then it could already be a sign of a hardware problem but to make our troubleshooting more thorough, try doing the forced reboot procedure again but this time while the phone is connected to its charger.

Verify there’s no liquid damage

It is important that you are very sure your phone isn’t suffering from liquid damage. There are things you need to do to know if water caused your phone to not turn on. Assuming your device has some liquid damage and you just turned a blind eye about it, then it’s very much possible your phone won’t be able to turn on anymore. As you know, water and electricity don’t mix and if an electronic device is submerged in water, a lot of bad things could happen. So, to verify that your phone doesn’t have liquid damage, try doing these things…

  • Clean the USB port using a cotton swab or insert a small piece of tissue into it so that the moisture will be absorbed.
  • You may also blow into the port or give it a blast of compressed air to get rid of debris or lint.
  • Also check the Liquid Damage Indicator which can be found inside the SIM card slot. Remove the SIM tray first and look into the slot. If the LDI is still white, then your phone is clear of liquid damage. But if the LDI turned to red, pink or purple, it’s a different story.

Try starting it up in Safe mode

Assuming there’s no sign of liquid damage whatsoever and your phone still remains unresponsive, you should try turning it up in Safe mode. This will temporarily disable all third-party and if one of them is causing the problem, then your phone should be able to boot up in this mode without any problem.

This is how to start your device in safe mode:

  1. Turn the device off.
  2. Press and hold the Power key past the model name screen.
  3. When “SAMSUNG” appears on the screen, release the Power key.
  4. Immediately after releasing the Power key, press and hold the Volume down key.
  5. Continue to hold the Volume down key until the device finishes restarting.
  6. Safe mode will display in the bottom left corner of the screen.
  7. Release the Volume down key when you see Safe Mode.

The moment your phone starts up successfully in this mode, the problem is already halfway to being solved. The next thing you should do is find the culprit and then uninstall it. You may then try rebooting your phone to normal mode to see if it works this time. You may have to uninstall more than one app to fix this problem. However, if your Galaxy A7 still refuses to power up even in this mode, then do the next procedure.

Try booting it up in Recovery mode

The Android system recovery menu also known as Recovery mode is actually the fail-safe of almost all Android devices. It powers up all hardware components but the interface won’t be loaded. If you can successfully bring your phone to boot up in this mode, then you can do a couple of things that might help fix the problem. The first thing would be to wipe the cache partition to delete and replace all system caches. If that doesn’t work then you have to do the Master reset which will bring the device back to its default settings. This is how you start it up in recovery mode:

  1. Turn off the device.
  2. Press and hold the Volume Up key and the Bixby key, then press and hold the Power key.
  3. When the green Android logo displays, release all keys (‘Installing system update’ will show for about 30 – 60 seconds before showing the Android system recovery menu options).

You then have to follow on-screen instructions to wipe the cache partition or do the master reset. If the screen remains blank after doing all these things, then you have no other choice but to get the phone checked by a technician. As far as basic troubleshooting it concerned, you’ve already done what you can. Now it’s time that you let the professional handle the problem for you.

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Samsung Galaxy S7 Email Account Set Up and Management [Comprehensive Guide]

Welcome to our first tutorial series of the latest flagship device from #Samsung, the Galaxy S7 (#GalaxyS7)! In this post, I have delineated one of the most important things usually done first by owners of new #smartphones that is, setting up an email account on the phone. Feel free to refer to this content should you need help in the process.

To give you a hint of what exactly this post is all about, here’s an outline of the topics it covers.

There are several types of email accounts supported by the Galaxy S7. This denotes you can set up multiple email accounts at one time. In order to successfully set up your email, be sure to have all key information such as username or User ID, password, and server settings all set.

Galaxy-S7-Email-Setup

You may contact your email service provider or carrier to ensure you have the correct information before setting up email account(s) on your new device. So let’s get started.

Setting up Email Account on your Galaxy S7

Before you start, ready all necessary information including your username, password, incoming, and outgoing server settings, port numbers, and other required settings for a POP3, IMAP, or Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync account.

  1. To get started, tap Apps from the Home screen.
  2. Tap Email.

Note: If you can’t find the Email app shortcut from the Apps screen, open the Samsung folder. On some GS7 variants, the Email app is located in the Samsung folder.

  1. On the next screen, tap Add New Account.

Note: If there is already an account registered on your phone, just tap an email address in the above-given list.

  1. Type in your email address and password.
  2. Tap MANUAL SETUP to proceed with manual account setup. Or, if you want your phone to complete the setup process by automatically searching for your email server settings, tap SIGN IN.
  3. Select MANUAL SETUP to proceed with this guide.
  4. Tap to select the type of email account you want to set up. You may choose any from POP3 account, IMAP account, and Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync.
  5. Enter the required server settings for your email account.
  6. Tap SIGN IN to continue.
  7. Wait for your device to verify if the server settings you enter are all correct. If your device successfully connects to the server using the settings you entered, you will be prompted with the Sync schedule screen.
  8. Configure sync options according to your preference.
  9. Tap SIGN IN.
  10. Enter a name for the account. If you want to create a signature to all your outgoing messages, you can enter your name or any signature you want to indicate on the appropriate field.
  11. Tap DONE to complete the process. After that, you should see email messages populating your inbox.

Adding Personal (POP3 and IMAP) Email Account on your Galaxy S7

There are two ways for you to add personal email account(s), either POP3 or IMAP on your Galaxy S7. One is directly from the stock email application and the other is through the Settings menu.

  1. Through the stock Email App
  2. Tap Apps from Home.
  3. Tap Email to launch the app. If necessary, tap to open the Samsung folder and then tap Email to launch it.
  4. From the Inbox screen, tap Menu.
  5. Select Settings.
  6. Tap Add account.
  7. Follow the onscreen instructions to complete setting up your new personal email account. After the setup, you should start getting emails for that account.
  8. Through the Settings Menu
  9. Tap Apps from Home.
  10. Tap Settings.
  11. Select Accounts.
  12. Tap Add account.
  13. Tap Email.
  14. Enter the email address and password for the email account on the designated fields.
  15. Tap Sign In to proceed with automatic setup and prompt your device to test the incoming and outgoing servers and attempt a regular email setup. Otherwise, tap Manual setup and enter your settings such as email type, username, password, security type, and server settings.
  16. Configure Sync settings as you prefer.
  17. Tap Next to continue.
  18. Specify an account name for the account and a display name (signature) for your outgoing mails.
  19. To complete the setup, tap Done.

Adding Exchange ActiveSync or Work Email Account on your Galaxy S7

The Galaxy S7 embeds some powerful Exchange features, allowing you to set up an Exchange ActiveSync, sync your phone with your work email, then read, manage, and send emails in the same easy manner as with your personal email account. Itemized below are the steps on how to set up a work email on your new Galaxy device.

Note: Before you begin, secure all required account settings information such as username, password, exchange server, and the like. Please contact the Exchange Server administrator or network administrator of your company to ensure you have the correct information. If you have everything ready, then you may start right away with these steps:

  1. Tap Apps from Home.
  2. Tap Settings.
  3. Tap Accounts.
  4. Tap Add account.
  5. Select Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync.
  6. Enter the email address and password for your work email on their designated fields.
  7. Tap Manual setup.
  8. Enter all necessary information for your email account settings such as the domain name\username, password, exchange servers, and the like.
  9. Follow the onscreen instructions to configure more options for the account.
  10. Specify an account name as well as a display name (signature) for your outgoing mails.
  11. Tap Done to complete the setup process.

Configure more Exchange ActiveSync Email settings on your Galaxy S7

Access more Exchange ActiveSync settings and customize your corporate emails according to your preference. Among the available options include sync options, flagging messages, out-of-office messages, meeting requests, and message priority. Here’s a quick guide on how to access and configure these settings on your S7.

  1. Tap Apps from Home.
  2. Open the Email app.
  3. From the Inbox screen, tap MORE to view additional options.
  4. Select Settings.
  5. To view available options for your Exchange ActiveSync account, tap the account name.
  6. To configure an option or setting, tap to select an option/setting you want to manage or change.

More tutorial topics on Samsung Galaxy S7 will soon populate in this page, so keep posted.

Connect with us

We will be glad to offer further assistance! For more queries or concerns about the Galaxy S7, you can reach us through this form. When you do, please indicate the details of your inquiries or pertinent topics you need help with and we’ll do our best to give you the answers you need.

How to troubleshoot Samsung Galaxy S7 that won’t turn on

You’re staring at a black screen on your new #Samsung Galaxy S7 (#GalaxyS7), wondering what to do because it turn on when you press the #Power key and it won’t respond no matter what. It’s new and it was working fine yesterday, left it lying on the table overnight with enough battery but in the morning, the screen is just black. What could have happened?

A few days after the Galaxy S7 was released, there were already owners that complained about their devices that won’t turn on. In fact, we already received a few complaints about this problem and so we publish this troubleshooting guide to address this very specific issue encountered by our readers. Read on to learn more about this problem and how to fix it.

Problem

Hi! I have the new Samsung Galaxy S7, it’s still 5 days old and it has been working since day 1 without issues until today. The screen is black and it looks like it has turned off. I tried to turn it on but it won’t. Tried charging it but it won’t respond either. I know I can go to the store where I bought it and have it replaced but it’s a 40-mile drive, so I want to try a few things first before heading out. What would you suggest I do to try to fix this problem? Thanks.

Symptoms and Possible Causes

Aside from the obvious black and unresponsive screen, there are other symptoms you may encounter when your new phone has this problem:

  • LED indicator is lit up but the screen is black and unresponsive
  • Screen is black, LED indicator is not lit and phone won’t turn on if Power button is pressed
  • You can hear the notification sounds but the screen is black
  • Device just turn off on its own and refused to power back up

This issue is common to all smartphones. In fact, we did receive hundreds of issues from our readers who encountered this problem using previous Galaxy models and among the most common causes are the following:

  • Battery completely drained that it takes a few minutes before the phone responds to the charger when plugged in
  • The Android system crashed leaving the phone unresponsive when the power key is press or if the charger is plugged in
  • Some downloaded apps keep crashing that also caused the system crash
  • The power key got stuck or damaged after the phone fell on a hard surface

Now, before we head to the instructions on how to troubleshoot this problem, if you have other problems visit our Galaxy S7 troubleshooting page as we may have already addressed your concern. Or, you can directly contact us by filling out this questionnaire. Please provide all relevant information about the problem so we can provide you with an accurate solution.

Step-by-step Troubleshooting

More often than not, won’t turn on issues are caused by system crashes. When it happens, the device won’t respond when you press the Power key and it won’t charge if you plug it in. It’s because the firmware plays a big role in starting up the hardware as well as charging the battery. So, here’s what you need to do in case this problem occurs…

First step: Force restart your Galaxy S7

By pressing and holding the Volume down and Power keys together for 10 seconds, your phone will perform the simulated battery disconnect. It’s just like when you pull the battery out of your phone to reset it.

This procedure is hardwired so it should work as long as it’s done correctly. Again, just press and hold the Volume Down and Power keys together for 10 seconds to do this.

Moreover, the Forced Reboot procedure will refresh the phone’s memory so whatever firmware and/or hardware glitch that occurred would be fixed immediately.

What if the forced reboot procedure failed?

Second step: Plug in your Galaxy S7 to charge

Maybe the reason why your phone turned off and won’t turn back on is because the battery got drained. It might also be the reason why the Forced Reboot procedure failed. So, it’s time you plugged the charger in and leave the device for, at least, 5 minutes before attempting to turn it on.

After 5 minutes of charging, try turning on your phone and if that won’t work, try the first step again.

Third step: See if the Galaxy S7 can boot in Recovery Mode

Now, this procedure will tell us whether it’s just a firmware issue or a serious hardware problem. In recovery mode, the Android GUI won’t be loaded during boot up but all the essential components will be powered up. So, if the phone boots up in recovery mode, it means the problem is with the firmware, probably. Otherwise, it’s a hardware problem.

  • Press and then hold the Home and Volume U keys, then press and hold the Power key.
  • When the Samsung Galaxy S7 shows on the screen, release the Power key but continue holding the Home and Volume Up keys.
  • When the Android logo shows, you may release both keys and leave the phone be for about 30 to 60 seconds.

If the phone can successfully boot up in recovery mode, proceed with wiping the cache partition using the Volume keys and the Power button to select the option and then try to boot up normally. However, if the recovery mode procedure failed, proceed to the last step.

What if the phone refused to boot up normally after the recovery mode?

Fourth step: Try booting the Galaxy S7 in safe mode

There’s a chance the problem was caused by a third-party app that may have crashed considering there are still apps in the Play Store that have compatibility issues with Android M (Marshmallow). In this case, you need to boot your phone safe mode just to see if it can and to rule out the possibility of the hardware problem once and for all.

  1. Press and hold the Power key.
  2. As soon as you can see the ‘Samsung Galaxy S7’ on the screen, release the Power key and immediately hold the Volume Down key.
  3. Continue holding the Volume Down button until the device finishes rebooting.
  4. You may release it when you can see ‘Safe mode’ in the bottom left corner of the screen.

If your phone successfully booted up in safe mode, try to uninstall suspected apps. Or, you can proceed with Factory reset through Settings or Master reset by booting up your phone in recovery mode again. Either way, the problem will be fixed. However, if the safe mode boot up was unsuccessful, then the last option is the last step.

Last step: Have the technician troubleshoot the problem or have the phone replaced

At this point, you did everything you could to try to fix the problem without compromising the phone’s safety and voiding the warranty. It’s time you went to the store where you bought it and let the technician check it for you. If the problem can’t be fixed by the tech, you will receive a replacement unit.

Having problems with your phone that won’t turn on?

We can help you troubleshoot. We already published troubleshooting guides for the following devices:

Phone Won\'t Turn On Troubleshooting

We are always willing to help our readers out so if you have problems with your new Samsung Galaxy S7, don’t hesitate to contact us by completing this form.

How to fix your Samsung Galaxy J3 that keeps restarting / rebooting [Troubleshooting Guide]

Samsung Galaxy J3 owners have been reaching out to us seeking assistance in determining what causes the phone to restart by itself. We may have addressed this issue before but we have to help our readers who are bugged by this problem.

Some of those owners recently updated their phones while others said the problem started without any apparent reason or cause. Whatever the case maybe, it’s certain that this problem is firmware-related unless of course, the phone suffered from either physical or liquid damage prior to this problem.

We will be suggesting things you can do with your Galaxy J3 that keeps rebooting on its own. We don’t suggest things that can potentially damage your device even more so rest assured that our troubleshooting guides are safe yet effective. If you’re one of the owners of this device, continue reading below as this post may help you.

However, if you are searching for a solution to a different problem, make sure you visit our Galaxy J3 troubleshooting page for we have already addressed a lot of issues reported by our readers. In case you need more help, fill up our questionnaire and hit submit to contact us.

Troubleshooting Galaxy J3 that keeps restarting


It is important that we check the phone for possible physical and liquid damage before we actually troubleshoot it. Remember, the Galaxy J3 doesn’t have the IP68 rating like the flagships. Then, we’ll move on to making sure it’s not a battery-related issue and the rest follows…

Check for physical and liquid damage

As to physical damage, it’s easier to check your phone for it since any force that will cause issues inside the device should leave marks, dents or even just scratches on the outside. It’s your phone so you should know if the phone got dropped on a hard pavement or not.

For liquid damage, it’s a bit complicated but you can do it on your own…

  • Check the charger/USB port for signs of moisture and if it looks like it’s wet, get a cotton swab  and clean around the area or insert a piece tissue into it to absorb moist.
  • Remove the SIM card and look into the SIM slot to find the liquid damage indicator. If the LDI remains white, your phone is free from liquid damage but if it turned red, pink or purple, then it’s positive.

Should you discover there are signs of physical and/or liquid damage, it’s better that you bring the phone to the tech.

Connect the phone to the charger

This isn’t to know if the phone charges or not but to know if the phone still restarts even if it has a stable power source. As you know, the battery will be the first one to deteriorate over time and when this happens, your phone may restart on its own from time to time or even shut down. Connecting your phone to the charger will give it a stable power source so if the problem is the battery, your device wouldn’t restart when used while connected to the charger. So, assuming that this is the case with your phone, you also need to bring it to the tech and have the battery replaced unless you want to continue using your phone and deal with the problem every day.

Observe your phone while in Safe mode

There is a possibility that one or some of the apps you installed is causing the problem especially if the problem still continues even if the phone is connected to its charger. At this point in our troubleshooting, it’s better to rule this possibility out and to do that, you have to start your phone up in Safe mode to temporarily disable all third-party apps:

  1. Turn the device off.
  2. Press and hold the Power key past the screen with the device name.
  3. When ‘SAMSUNG’ appears on the screen, release the Power key.
  4. Immediately after releasing the Power key, press and hold the Volume down key.
  5. Continue to hold the Volume down key until the device finishes restarting.
  6. Safe mode will display in the bottom left corner of the screen.
  7. Release the Volume down key when you see ‘Safe Mode’.

Continue using your phone while in this mode and if the problem doesn’t occur, then you should find the apps that suspect are causing the problem and uninstall them one by one:

  1. From any Home screen, tap the Apps icon.
  2. Tap Settings.
  3. Tap Applications.
  4. Tap the desired application in the default list or tap Menu icon > Show system apps to display pre-installed apps.
  5. Tap Uninstall.
  6. Tap Uninstall again to confirm.

However, if the problem continues while in this mode, try doing the next step.

Wipe the cache partition

Wiping the cache partition will delete all system caches and replace them. You know, some of those cached files may have been corrupted or are already obsolete. Considering the fact that this problem might be with the firmware, this procedure may help fix it. All you gotta do is start your phone up in recovery mode, or follow these steps:

  1. Turn off the device.
  2. Press and hold the Volume Up key and the Home key, then press and hold the Power key.
  3. When the device logo screen displays, release only the Power key.
  4. When the Android logo displays, release all keys (‘Installing system update’ will show for about 30 – 60 seconds before showing the Android system recovery menu options).
  5. Press the Volume down key several times key to highlight ‘wipe cache partition’.
  6. Press the Power key to select.
  7. Press the Volume down key to highlight ‘yes’ and press the Power key to select.
  8. When the wipe cache partition is complete, ‘Reboot system now’ is highlighted.
  9. Press the Power key to restart the device.

If the problem still remains after this, then you really have to reset your phone to fix the problem.

Backup all your files and reset your phone

This is your last resort and it goes at the end of the guide because of the hassle you will have to undergo in backing up your files and data. Even if your phone has serious firmware issue, the reset may be able to fix it. Follow these steps after you’re done backing up your important files and data to reset your device:

  1. Back up data on the internal memory. If you have signed into a Google account on the device, you have activated Anti-theft and will need your Google credentials to finish the Master reset.
  2. Turn off the device.
  3. Press and hold the Volume Up key and the Home key, then press and hold the Power key.
  4. When the device logo screen displays, release only the Power key
  5. When the Android logo displays, release all keys (‘Installing system update’ will show for about 30 – 60 seconds before showing the Android system recovery menu options).
  6. Press the Volume down key several times key to highlight ‘wipe data / factory reset.’
  7. Press Power button to select.
  8. Press the Volume down key until ‘Yes — delete all user data’ is highlighted.
  9. Press Power button to select and start the master reset.
  10. When the master reset is complete, ‘Reboot system now’ is highlighted.
  11. Press the Power key to restart the device.

Should the problem continue after the reset, bring your phone to the tech as it’s most likely a hardware problem. I hope that this troubleshooting guide can help you fix the problem with your phone.

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What to do with your Samsung Galaxy S8 that won’t charge?

Charging issues are among the most common problems reported by Samsung Galaxy S8 owners. There were those who complained about slow charging while there were also those who reported their devices won’t charge anymore.

Below are the most basic troubleshooting procedures you need to do to try to fix the problem. But the purpose of this troubleshooting guide is simply to isolate the problem and rule out the most common possibilities. After ruling out every possibility and the problem continues, then you have the option to bring the phone to the service center.

Step 1: Force restart your Galaxy S8

It’s imperative you do this procedure first since there are cases wherein charging issues are caused by a system glitch. Press and hold the Volume Down and Power keys together for 10 seconds. Your device will reboot normally and after this, connect your phone to its charger to see if it charges.

Step 2: Make sure you’re using the original charger and cable

Before you move on to other troubleshooting procedures, verify that you’re using the original charger and cable. Third-party chargers may tell you they have the same output as with the original charger but they really don’t. By using the OEM charger and cable, you’re already isolating the problem.

Step 3: Check for possible liquid damage

Always remember electricity and water don’t mix well and if there’s a sign that your phone has some sort of liquid damage, you can always expect your phone may not charge. If there’s moist in the charger port, you might get the “moisture detected” warning. You may also have to check the Liquid Damage Indicator to see if it’s tripped; remove the SIM card tray and look into the SIM slot. If the LDI turned red, pink or purple instead of white, then it’s tripped. It’s clear your phone is suffering from liquid damage.

Step 4: Turn your phone off and charge

After making sure your phone doesn’t have liquid damage, turn it off and connect it to its charger. If there’s no problem with the firmware and the hardware, your phone will charge when everything is powered off. The usual charging icon may show on the screen and the LED indicator will be lit up.

Step 5: Bring your phone to the service center

After doing all these steps and your phone still refuses to charge, it’s time to bring it to the shop and let the tech run some tests. Do the same if the device heats up when connected to the charger or if there’s a sign of liquid damage. It’s dangerous to troubleshoot a phone with liquid damage, you just don’t know what happens next.

Connect with us

We are always open to your problems, questions and suggestions, so feel free to contact us by filling up this form. This is a free service we offer and we won’t charge you a penny for it. But please note that we receive hundreds of emails every day and it’s impossible for us to respond to every single one of them. But rest assured we read every message we receive. For those whom we’ve helped, please spread the word by sharing our posts to your friends or by simply liking our Facebook and Google+ page or follow us on Twitter.

Samsung Galaxy S8 became too hot and won’t turn on

This post is intended to owners of the Samsung Galaxy S8 whose phones started to heat up for no reason at all and won’t turn on. This kind of problem happens all the time and while we can say it’s an issue with the firmware, we have to make sure it’s not due to liquid or physical damage.

Overheating could be a sign of liquid damage. The S8 however, is dust and water resistant so it has at least, more protection when it comes to water damage. But the downside is that you become complacent thinking the phone is well-protected. One thing to note here is that the IP68 rating is actually not to make your phone “waterproof” so there’s still a chance liquid can enter into your device and mess it up. This should be the first thing we need to look into but before we move on, here’s the problem we received from one of our readers…

Plugged my phone in last night like always. It was working just fine; took pics and video of my son and this morning my phone was hot and not turning on at all. I tried taking off the cover and it cooled off but still not turning on. Please help. I have a Samsung Galaxy S8.

This troubleshooting guide will be based on this problem but if you are looking for a solution to a different problem, then make sure you drop by our Galaxy S8 troubleshooting page for we have already addressed many issues with this phone. If you need more help from us, fill up our Android issues questionnaire and hit submit to contact us.

Troubleshooting Galaxy S8 that became too hot and won’t turn on

Before we move on to our troubleshooting steps, I just want to say that safety is our first priority and that goes for the phone and the owner. I won’t suggest any procedure here that might damage the phone or compromise the wellbeing of the owner. With that being said, here’s what you have to do about this problem…

Make sure it’s not due to liquid damage

Before anything else, it’s imperative you take time verifying if the problem is caused by liquid damage or not because if it is, you may do more damage to your phone than fix it especially that this troubleshooting guide includes a step wherein you have to charge your phone. Here are the things you need to do to check your phone for possible liquid damage…

  • Blow into the USB port to get rid moisture, debris and/or lint. If you have a can of compressed air, give it a blast.
  • Use a cotton swab to clean around the area.
  • Insert a small piece of tissue into the USB port to absorb moist.
  • Remove the SIM card tray and look into the slot to find out if the Liquid Damage Indicator is tripped. If the LDI is still white, then there’s no sign of liquid damage but it’s a different story if it became red, pink or purple.

Find out if the phone still charges

After making sure your phone isn’t suffering from liquid damage, try to plug the charger to a working wall outlet and connect your phone to it. Here’s why you need to do this…

  • It’s important that your phone still charges fine as there’s a possibility the problem is with the hardware.
  • If it charges fine, it’s also important to make sure it’s not heating up as overheating may lead to more serious problems.
  • If the phone charges, how long does it take to fully charge its battery.
  • What happens if you try to turn your phone one while it’s charging.
  • The device should at least show you the charging icon and lights up the LED indicator. If these signs don’t show, allow your phone to charge for ten minutes.

Do the Forced Restart procedure

Regardless whether the phone charges or not, if it still won’t turn on, then you better perform the Forced Reboot procedure. Doing so will have these benefits…

  • It will refresh the phone’s memory as it will simulate battery disconnect.
  • If the problem is due to a system crash, your phone may start up normally.
  • To force restart your phone, press and hold the volume down and power keys together for 7 to 10 seconds.
  • Try doing it while the phone isn’t connected to the charger, if it doesn’t respond, connect it to the charger and do the same thing.

Try booting the phone up in Safe mode

It is very much possible that one or some of the third-party apps you installed is causing the problem. If the procedures above don’t work, then you should try running your phone in Safe mode; it will temporarily disable all third-party apps. If one of them is the cause of the heating up and being unresponsive, then doing this procedure may bring your phone to life. This is how you boot your Galaxy S8 in safe mode:

  1. Turn the device off.
  2. Press and hold the Power key past the model name screen.
  3. When “SAMSUNG” appears on the screen, release the Power key.
  4. Immediately after releasing the Power key, press and hold the Volume down key.
  5. Continue to hold the Volume down key until the device finishes restarting.
  6. Safe mode will display in the bottom left corner of the screen.
  7. Release the Volume down key when you see Safe Mode.

If the device successfully booted up in safe mode, then you’re already halfway to knowing and fixing the problem. The next thing you should do in this case is find the app that’s causing it and then uninstall it.

  1. From the Home screen, swipe up on an empty spot to open the Apps tray.
  2. Tap Settings > Apps.
  3. Tap the desired application in the default list or tap 3 dots icon > Show system apps to display pre-installed apps.
  4. Tap the desired application.
  5. Tap Uninstall.
  6. Tap Uninstall again to confirm.

Try starting the phone up in Recovery Mode

You only have to do this if your phone won’t boot up in safe mode. The Android system recovery menu actually serves as the fail-safe for your device. Even if the problem is due to a serious firmware issue it may still be able to start in this mode and if successful, you can do a couple of things that have big impact on the firmware and might just fix the problem for you. The first thing you should do is wipe the cache partition to delete all system caches. If that doesn’t work, then you must try to do the master reset which will bring the phone back to its factory default settings. Here’s how you try to start your phone up in Recovery mode:

  1. Turn off the device.
  2. Press and hold the Volume Up key and the Bixby key, then press and hold the Power key.
  3. When the green Android logo displays, release all keys (‘Installing system update’ will show for about 30 – 60 seconds before showing the Android system recovery menu options).

After doing all these procedures and your phone is still heating up and/or not turning one, then you should bring the phone back to the store so that the technician can check it. It’s possible that the problem is due to a serious hardware issue especially if the phone doesn’t charge and not booting up in safe mode and recovery mode.

I hope that this troubleshooting guide can help you with your problem.

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How to fix Samsung Galaxy A5 black screen of death issue [Troubleshooting Guide]

The black screen of death is more often characterized by blank and unresponsive screen which leaves an impression that the phone is turned off. Sometimes you can see the LED indicator flashing, which indicates the phone is actually still on and just being unresponsive. Some of our readers that own Samsung Galaxy A5 units have contacted us regarding this problem that’s why we have to publish a post that addresses it.

In this article, we will tackle this issue and look into every possibility. We will try to determine what the problem really is and try to find a solution that will fix it for good. Sometimes it’s easy to fix this issue but there are times when it’s very complicated. So, if you own this phone and are currently bugged by a similar problem, continue reading.

But before we actually move on to our troubleshooting, if you have other issues with your phone, then visit our Galaxy A5 troubleshooting page as we’ve already addressed some of the most common problems with this device. In case you need more help with your problem, fill up our Android issues questionnaire and hit submit to contact us.

Troubleshoot Galaxy A5 with black screen of death problem

There’s only so much we can do with your phone that won’t turn on and respond but it’s imperative that as the owner, you will have to do something to try and fix it. It’s possible that it’s just a minor problem and that gives us a good chance to make the device work perfectly again. With that said, here’s what I suggest you do about this issue…

Try doing the Forced Restart procedure

This will restart your Galaxy A5 that might have been frozen or crashed. Many of those who encountered this kind of problem reported to have fixed it using this method. For those who own previous models with removable batteries said pulling the battery out, which basically has the same effect as the forced restart, seems to fix the problem.

So, to do this, press and hold both the volume down and the power keys together for 10 seconds. If the phone boots up normally after this, then it was just a system crash or a even a minor glitch in the system. However, if the phone still won’t respond to this, then try doing the next procedure.

Verify it’s not due to liquid damage

It is important that you go through this just to make sure the problem isn’t due to liquid damage. We have readers who reported to have damaged their phones when they attempted to charge them because they didn’t know that liquid has found its way into their device. We know too well that water and electricity don’t mix so it’s better to be careful.

  • Check the USB port to see if it’s wet or not.
  • If the port is wet or has some trace of moisture, use a cotton swab to clean around the area or insert a small piece of tissue into it to absorb the moist.
  • Remove the SIM card tray and look into the slot to find the liquid damage indicator. It’s a small sticker that turns red, pink or purple if tripped. If it’s white, then you have nothing to worry about.

After making sure it’s not due to liquid damage, move on to the next procedure. However, if the black screen is due to physical or liquid damage, then bring your phone to the shop and let the tech evaluate the problem.

Charge the phone and see if it turns on

Another possibility that your phone won’t turn on is that its battery may have been drained out. So, after making sure there’s no sign of liquid damage, it’s time to plug the charger to a working wall outlet and then connect the phone to it.

Usually you will see the charging icon on the screen and the LED indicator should be lit up the moment the phone detects electric current flows through its circuits. This is one way to determine if the problem is related to the hardware or if it’s just a minor issue with the firmware.

Regardless whether the charging signs show or not, allow your phone to charge for at least, ten minutes but be mindful if it’s heating up when plugged in or not. If it does, disconnect it from its charger immediately and bring it to the nearest shop.

After ten minutes of charging, try to turn the phone on. If it doesn’t respond, try doing the Forced Restart procedure while the phone is plugged in.

Try to start the phone in safe mode

We need to rule out the possibility that this problem is caused by some of the third-party apps you downloaded and installed. So in this step, I want you to start your phone in safe mode or at least, try. By running your phone in this environment, you’re actually temporarily disabling all third-party apps that may have caused the phone to not respond. Here’s how you do that…

  1. Turn the device off.
  2. Press and hold the Power key past the model name screen.
  3. When “SAMSUNG” appears on the screen, release the Power key.
  4. Immediately after releasing the Power key, press and hold the Volume down key.
  5. Continue to hold the Volume down key until the device finishes restarting.
  6. Safe mode will display in the bottom left corner of the screen.
  7. Release the Volume down key when you see Safe Mode.

Assuming your phone successfully booted up in this mode, then it’s time to find the apps that cause the problem and then uninstall them one by one until it’s fixed.

  1. From the Home screen, tap the Apps tray.
  2. Tap Settings > Apps.
  3. Tap the desired application in the default list or tap 3 dots icon > Show system apps to display preinstalled apps.
  4. Tap the desired application.
  5. Tap Uninstall.
  6. Tap Uninstall again to confirm.

If however, your phone still remains to be unresponsive after trying to start it up in safe mode, then you should try the next step.

Run your phone into Recovery mode

The Android system recovery is the fail-safe of almost all Android devices that’s why it’s called the “Recovery Mode” as you can actually recover your phone that might be bugged with a firmware issue through it. Actually, what you’re going to do while in this mode is to wipe the cache partition first, which will delete and replace all system caches. Then you need to reboot your phone to see if it boots up successfully. If not, you have to do the master reset, which will bring the phone back to its factory default settings but also delete all your files and data.

The master reset is your last resort but if it fails, then you need to bring the phone to the shop and let the technician handle the problem for you.

Here’s how you boot your Galaxy A5 in Recovery mode…

  1. Turn off the device.
  2. Press and hold the Volume Up key and the Home key, then press and hold the Power key.
  3. When the Android logo displays, release all keys (‘Installing system update’ will show for about 30 – 60 seconds, then ‘No command’ before showing the Android system recovery menu options).

I hope that this troubleshooting guide can help you fix the problem with your phone.

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Pokemon Go Guide, Tips and Cheats for Beginners

Recently released game by Nintendo has been a huge hit.  After releasing last Wednesday, it became the most downloaded game app in the app store just two days later.

The app engagement for this game is astonishing, there’s already as many U.S. users on Android for this game as there is on Twitter.  And the average minutes used per day on Pokemon Go spends of 43 minutes exceeds that of Whatsapp.

If you’ve become a fan of the game, here are some tips for Pokemon Go.

How to change ringtone on Samsung Galaxy S7

If you’re sick of the default Samsung Galaxy S7 ringtone, changing the ringtone is very easy.  Your Galaxy S7 is actually preloaded with several ringtones that you may like.  If you don’t like the preloaded ringtones, you also have the option of selecting a song as your ringtone.  Simply follow the instructions in the video below, toward the bottom of the default ringtones, you will see an option to “Add ringtone”, that’s where you can select the song you like as a ringtone.