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LG G Pad 7.0 features revealed: KitKat, Snapdragon 400 chip, 1 GB RAM

After timidly trying its hand at tablets for the first time in eons with the compact-but-punchy G Pad 8.3, LG seems to have found its footing in the ever-growing, ever-competitive market, feeling secure enough to turn the G Pad from a one-off affair into a family of devices.

LG-G-Pad-7

Made official teased a couple of days back, the G Pad 7.0, 8.0 and 10.1 are tipped to get actual, detailed introductions at some point this week, during a Monaco tech trade show called MedPI. If you’re like ourselves however, patience is not your number one virtue, so any information obtained early is pure gold.

Luckily, and thanks to benchmarking authority AnTuTu, we now have a fairly thorough scoop on G Pad 7.0’s specifications. I know, the 10-incher’s features would have probably been much juicier, but beggars can’t be choosers, right?

The thing is there doesn’t seem to be anything special about this 7-inch G Pad, aka V400. Nothing at all. Sure, LG promised us an “on-the-go entertainment hub that delivers both portability and power”, but I fail to see the power part translated into reality.

I mean, can you really call a Snapdragon 400 machine powerful in 2014? With four cares, true that, but each clocked at a measly 1.2 GHz. The 1 GB of RAM isn’t particularly hot either (last year’s G Pad 8.3 packed twice as much), whereas the dual cameras are a pain to read.

LG G Pad 7.0

3.2 and 1.3 megapixels respectively. My eyes are burning! What else? Oh, yeah, keeping with the spec sheet’s 2012 vibe, the display sports 1,280 x 800 pixels. And you get 8 GB built-in storage, though at this point 16 would have been a genuine miracle.

Finally, Android 4.4.2 KitKat runs the software show, being basically the sole tidbit that signals the G Pad 7.0 has a place in the 2014 Android tablet ecosystem.

Of course, LG can still make the G Pad 7.0 (partially) attractive. The design looked like a hit from the get-go, with a wasp waist, slim bezels and funky paint jobs, and, if the Koreans keep costs in check, the soon-to-launch low-ender may well give fellow budget contenders a run for their money. Not the Nexus 7 2013 though. Or the 2012 version. Or Amazon’s Kindle Fire HD 7.

Yeah, sounds like an uphill battle to me too.

Via [AnTuTu China]