Galaxy Note 3 vs Sony Xperia Z1 vs LG G2 vs iPhone 5s – Benchmark Comparison, Take Two

Posted on Oct 1 2013 - 10:35am by Adrian Diaconescu

By popular demand and hopefully presumably to the utter despair and hopelessness of Apple fanboys, we’re already back with another spectacular installment of our high-end smartphone benchmarking saga.

Galaxy_Note_3_vs_Xperia_Z1

Well, not so much “ours” as rounded up from a number of external sources, but you know how it is. Not everyone is important enough and not everyone is willing to do enough ass-kissing to score review units of the hottest, most technically impressive slabs of silicon out and about.

Also, money doesn’t grow on trees for us all, so buying the devices that are actually up for grabs and performing our own benchmarks is not an alternative either. Oh, well, maybe someday…

For the time being, let’s put those wicked analysis and summarization skills to use once again, as a new batch of benchmark results has popped up online. Sadly, I’ve not managed to find anything fresh on the Apple iPhone 5s front, which is not what I can say about Samsung’s Galaxy Note 3.

Still unavailable for sale in many markets across the globe, including the US of A, the GNote 3 has been put through an exhaustive series of tests by an old pal, YouTube user Mike of GadgetJM. So let us put the scores into further perspective by pitting them against those of the Sony Xperia Z1, LG G2 (some of which have been updated since our last look) and, where available, Apple’s iPhone 5s:

3DMark Unlimited – Ice Storm

Galaxy Note 3 – 19,000 points

Xperia Z1 – 17,200

LG G2 – 15,400

iPhone 5s – 14,000

galaxy-note-3-vs-iphone-5s

That Apple’s latest crown jewel is no competition for Android giants in this ultra-demanding high-performance GPU test shouldn’t come as a shocker for anyone anymore. What’s a little surprising (emphasis on “little”) is GNote 3’s jaw-dropping edge over the Z1 and G2.

And mind you, Z1’s score is not that of a pre-release unit, but a fully functional, fully optimized and fully commercial product. Meanwhile, it’s still mind-boggling how LG’s stupid controversial software tweaks affect the hardware to the point that it puts off each and every speed addict. Pick yourself up, LG! After all, you’re using the same exact CPU/GPU combo as Samsung and Sony, aren’t you?

Geekbench 3.0

Samsung Galaxy Note 3 – 2,900

Xperia Z1 – 2,800

iPhone 5s – 2,500

LG G2 – 2,200

Note 3 Geekbench

Seeing how aggressively Apple aficionados tech reviewers are flaunting this test around, making it seem like the Holy Grail of benchmarks, you’d think the iPhone 5s can at least fend off some of the competition. You know, the late 2013 competition, not the Galaxy S4 or HTC One many are comparing it against.

But alas (for them, not for us), the 5s doesn’t even play in the same league as the Note 3 or Z1. Sure, it beats the G2 to the punch, but do I really have to spell out for you who’s to blame for that?

Before moving on, a piece of advice for everyone tuning in: never, ever, ever trust one single benchmark, no matter how reliable it may seem and how impressive its “marketing” efforts. That said, the score is now Samsung 2 – Apple 0, even after a fight on Cupertino’s home turf. Chew on that, fanboys!

Quadrant

Galaxy Note 3 – 22,000

LG G2 – 21,700

Xperia Z1 – 20,700

galaxy-note-3-vs-lg-g2

After getting rid of the iPain in the ass (patent pending), which is systematically being tested only in a very specific handful of benchmarks (I wonder why), it’s time to become serious, stop with the jokes and puns and see which of Android’s beasts comes out on top as far as raw speed is concerned.

Well, I’m sorry, Sony, we believed in you, and also sorry, LG, we hardly knew you, but Samsung’s fantastic 5.7-incher is simply unbeatable. True, the Quadrant test, measuring CPU, I/O and 3D graphics performance, has delivered very close scores between these three super-phones, with the G2 actually undercutting the Z1 for once, but ultimately it’s still the Note 3 that prevails.

Vellamo HTML5

LG G2 – 2,910

Sony Xperia Z1 – 2,890

Note 3 – 2,870

Note 3 Vellamo

Talk about jumping to conclusions early, eh? Just as I was getting ready to declare the Note 3 the absolute heavyweight champion of the smartphone world, something like this happens and changes everything. Well, maybe not everything, but you have to admit the Vellamo HTML5 test makes the war a little more intriguing to watch.

And mind you, this is a benchmark evaluating mobile web browser performance, so it’s probably not easy for Samsung to yield a clash that’s likely to mean the world for many tech-savvy individuals out there. At the same time, it’s not like the Note 3 was crushed here, folding for a measly 40 points, which probably is nothing when translated into real-life speed.

GFX Bench 2.7 T-Rex HD onscreen

iPhone 5s – 37 fps

Galaxy Note 3 – 26

Xperia Z1 – 24

LG G2 – 23

iPhone 5s

Oh noes, the iPhone 5s is back in the mix and, for a change, tops the charts, actually bringing mayhem to its three adversaries. And that’s despite the Note 3, Z1 and LG G2, all tested before in GFX Bench, all boosting their initial scores. Bummer!

On the bright side, we know very well the reason why Apple’s top dog performs so impressively here is its lower-resolution screen. And you can try as much as you want, but you’ll never convince me the human eye detects nothing of the pixel density differences between the screen on the iPhone 5s, and, say, GNote 3’s stupendous Full HD Super AMOLED panel. Never!

I’m just too stubborn to get it through my thick head that 1,136 x 640 pixels, or 326 ppi, is the same thing as 1,920 x 1,080 pixels, or 386 ppi. End of story, bye, bye Apple and, oh, by the way, the Xperia Z1 and LG G2 have nothing on Samsung’s Galaxy Note 3. The king (i.e, the Galaxy S4) is dead, long live the new S Pen-toting king!  

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About the Author

Adrian has an insatiable passion for writing ever since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about technology and gadgets in general and Android in particular.