iPhone 5s vs Galaxy Note 3 vs LG G2 vs Sony Xperia Z1 – Benchmark Comparison, Take One

Posted on Sep 24 2013 - 9:00am by Adrian Diaconescu
RATING

If it’s not obvious already, you’re on an Android blog. And you’re reading the words of a relentless, unapologetic (wink, wink) Android aficionado. But that doesn’t mean I, as well as everyone here at The Droid Guy, don’t like to keep an open mind and just discard everything that doesn’t run Google’s silky smooth mobile OS.

android-vs-apple

So as hard as it might be for you to believe, I’m willing to give Apple’s new iPhone 5s a chance to divert my attention away from such jewels as Samsung’s Galaxy S4 and Note 3, LG’s G2 or Sony’s Xperia Z Ultra and Z1.

Sure, their newest best thing is tiny, sports a display that’s crammed and low-res and a rear-facing camera that on paper can’t hold a candle to Z1’s stupendous 20 MP snapper. But maybe Apple’s seemingly gimmicky 64-bit A7 CPU can turn things around for the iPhone 5S and make it such a powerhouse that all the flaws will pale in comparison.

Still, with the new iPhone only available for a few days and the GNote 3 or Xperia Z1 mostly unavailable around the world, we’ll have to give it some extra time until thorough enough reviews and benchmark tests will be performed to prove beyond the shadow of a doubt which of the three is the numero uno smartphone out there in terms of raw speed.

galaxy-note-3-vs-iphone-5s

For now, we’ll have to settle with just bits and pieces, which are very important, mind you, but not 100% conclusive. Here goes the first part of the iPhone 5s vs Note 3 vs Xperia Z1 vs LG G2 ultimate benchmark smackdown.

SunSpider (lower is better)

iPhone 5S: 416 milliseconds

Galaxy Note 3: 650 ms

Xperia Z1: 830

LG G2: 900

iphone-5s

In lack of iPhone 5s scores in popular benchmarking tools such as AnTuTu, Vellamo or Quadrant, we have to start the festivities with SunSpider, a test of browsing muscle. Probably unsurprising, Apple’s big guy puts one in the win column quite comfortably here, due to both its road-opening (we can’t deny them that) 64-bit processor and very particular software optimizations.

While the LG G2 and Xperia Z1 are clearly no competition for the 5s, we have to underline Note 3’s score came by way of a pre-release prototype’s test, meaning the commercial unit will likely get much closer to the iPhone. Then again, it’s unlikely to beat it, so point Apple.

Geekbench 3.0

Xperia Z1: 2,800 points

iPhone 5s: 2,500

LG G2: 2,100

Galaxy S4 Octa: 2,000

Sony Xperia Z1

Well, well, well, guess what, not all browser benchmarks are so kind to the new iPhone. Granted, the 2,500 score is pretty darn impressive, but since Geekbench theoretically relies more than anything on CPU performance, it should be pretty disappointing (for them, certainly not for us) to see Z1’s Snapdragon 800, a 32-bit SoC, kick A7’s ass. And by so much!

Meanwhile, the GNote 3 is yet to be taken through the Geekbench hoops, so I took the liberty to add the octa-core variant of the GS4 in the mix for comparison purposes. And true, this thing has nothing on the 5s. But a 500-point edge for a device released six months after its adversary is certainly not that remarkable, is it?

GFXBench 2.7 T-Rex HD offscreen and onscreen

iPhone 5s: 24.7 Fps and 37.4

Galaxy S4 LTE-A: 26.4 Fps and 26.5

Xperia Z1: 22.9 Fps and 24.1

LG G2: 21.8 Fps and 23.0

iPhone 5s GFX

The iPhone 5s takes this battle and is now two for three, which we have to admit is a very nice record. But it’s also not a conclusive one, since the Note 3 is once again missing the battle. Meanwhile, the LTE-Advanced flavor of the Galaxy S4 actually puts up a decent fight against the 5s, defeating it in the off-screen chapter of this very thorough GPU benchmark test, but being subsequently put to shame onscreen.

What does that tell us? Intriguingly, that the biggest iPhone 5s selling point in the performance department might not be the CPU after all, but instead the graphics processing unit. Or so it seems.

3DMark Unlimited – Ice Storm

Galaxy S4 LTE-A – 17,000 points

Xperia Z1 – 16,800

LG G2 – 15,400

iPhone 5s – 14,000

samsung-galax-s4-lte-a

Now this is embarrassing. And I won’t even try to contain or hide my delight. How could I? I mean, the iPhone 5s came dead last in a competition based on a very meticulous and trustworthy test, which essentially measures how the CPU and GPU work together towards an only goal.

And once again, the Note 3 is yet to have its performance tested. Can you imagine how much Samsung’s 5.7-incher will change the ranks both here and in Geekbench and GFX Bench? I can and I tell you, it won’t look pretty for Apple.

But let’s back up for a second and look at the Ice Storm scores one more time. Something there that draws your attention? A shocker, maybe? Well, yeah, the Korean-only LTE-A GS4 comes out on top, defeating Apple’s “big” guy by an incredible margin of 3,000 points. With the risk of repeating myself, that… is… really… embarrassing.

Early conclusions

That’s a wrap, kind gentlemen and lovely ladies, but be sure to look through the source links below for more benchmarks, mostly starring the iPhone 5s. And remember, all the above is just a sample of the much too complex and complicated smackdown between the best smartphones of today.

iphone_5s_64_bit

Also, it’s too early for verdicts. Granted, the 5s looks mighty strong from a number of standpoints. But at the same time, given all that 64-bit hoopla, the world expected more. Did you? Is anyone really, truly, seriously considering jumping ship from Android to iOS? And if so, are you sure you don’t need a checkup?

Sources: Anandtech, Gizmodo, GFX Bench, Appadvice, PC Mag, YouTube, Tbreak, GSM Arena

iPhone 5s vs Galaxy Note 3 vs LG G2 vs Sony Xperia Z1 – Benchmark Comparison, Take One was last modified: September 24th, 2013 by Adrian Diaconescu
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About the Author

Adrian has an insatiable passion for writing ever since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about technology and gadgets in general and Android in particular.