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LG G2 vs Galaxy S4 vs HTC One vs Xperia Z Ultra – Benchmark Smackdown Revisited

It was only one month ago (to the day, actually) that I first pitted the fastest Android smartphones (at that time) against one another in an attempt to find out which was the best of the best. Though controversial and, according to some, silly, benchmarks were the tool I used for my comparison, only I didn’t exactly reach a complete and satisfactory verdict.

Qualcomm-snapdragon-800

There wasn’t enough data to fully evaluate the Samsung Galaxy S4 LTE-A and Sony Xperia Z Ultra, while the original Galaxy S4 seemed to narrowly edge the HTC One, but not hold its own very well against the two Snapdragon 800-powered contenders.

Meanwhile, the main point I intended to prove with that benchmark smackdown was that times are changing and, once more Snapdragon 800 phones will go official, the ranks will undergo significant shifts as well.

And on that note, let’s all welcome the LG G2. This fellow is technically the world’s third ever handheld to come packing Snapdragon 800 heat, but it has the chance to become the very first available on a global scale. And while benchmark results ahead of commercial releases can be tricky and deceptive, there’s no better time than now to see how G2’s scores compare with all of the other high-end beasts.

LG-G2

Antutu results

Three different websites have taken the G2 for a spin in AnTuTu and, as expected, they’ve each come up with a distinct score. The highest is 29,057, the lowest 24,005, while Droid-Life’s 27,750 points sits right in the middle.

All those results surprisingly pale in comparison with Xperia Z Ultra’s 34,000 and Galaxy S4 LTE-A’s 31,500 points, but I can’t stress enough how tricky AnTuTu can be. And in all honesty, we’ve seen both the Ultra and S4 LTE-A score less than the above mentioned numbers (though mostly in the 29,000 – 31,000 range).

LG G2-AnTuTu

With all that in mind and emphasizing once again it’s too early to make definitive rulings on this or that, I think it’s safe to assume LG has some work to do with optimizing software. The same exact processor, with the same clock speed, GPU and 2 GB of RAM, is inside all three phones, so in theory their performance should be identical.

If that’s not the case, it’s because of the pre-loaded software, which is either glitchy or has tweaks that hinder the hardware’s raw speed.

Meanwhile, nothing’s changed for the original GS4 and HTC One, phones incapable of going over the 25,000 points mark in AnTuTu and therefore lightweights compared with today’s cream of the crop.

Quadrant battle

Again tested three times, again delivering three very different results. The LG G2 scored 20,261 max, 15,633 at its lowest point and 19,367 in Android Community’s hands-on. Side note: Isn’t it odd Droid-Life has the lowest score this time and not Android Police?

LG G2-Quadrant

Anyways, let’s say that things look much rosier for LG’s big guy here. That 20,000 puts every other phone out there to shame, even the 19,000 is enough for gold, while 15,600 still puts it in second, behind the Galaxy S4 LTE-A, but ahead of the Xperia Z Ultra, original S4 and HTC One.

But I’m confused. Does that mean LG’s potentially glitchy software only acts out on occasion? Maybe. Or maybe AnTuTu is really not trustworthy at all.

Ice Storm Extreme

Android Police is the only website to have tested the LG G2 in other benchmarks than AnTuTu and Quadrant, namely also in Ice Storm and Vellamo. The 9,692 points score in the former is fairly impressive, but compared with the Z Ultra and GS4 LTE-A is again not enough.

LG G2-Ice-Storm-Vellamo

To be specific, we’ve seen Sony’s numero uno handheld get very close to the 12,000 points mark, whereas the Korean-only Snapdragon 800 S4 has scored an explosive 12,600. Meanwhile, the first edition of the GS4 and the HTC One have both choked before hitting 7,000, so at least the G2 is much zippier than those two.

Vellamo

Unlike all the previous tests, this thing measures something other than CPU or GPU performance. Namely, mobile web browser speed, which as we know very well depends a lot on software and how “clean” and optimized it is.

Sadly, we’re yet to see the Galaxy S4 LTE-A jump the Vellamo hoops, so the battle for gold is between the LG G2 and Sony Xperia Z Ultra only. Unsurprisingly, Sony’s 6.4-incher comes out on top once again, scoring roughly 2,800 points, which is close to 300 points better than LG’s 5.2-incher. Ouch!

LG-G2-2

The HTC One and Galaxy S4 should do a fairly honorable job in loading The Droid Guy as well, given we’ve spotted them scoring close to 2,400 and around 2,000 points respectively.

Wrap-up

Sorry, LG, but for some reason your G2 appears to change nothing. It’s clearly snappier than the Galaxy S4 and HTC One, only it’s also pretty clearly thrown against the wall by Sony’s Xperia Z Ultra in the benchmark war. And the GS4 LTE-A, but that fellow doesn’t really count in the global fight.

lg-g2-3

Fortunately for you, LG, there’s still time. Time to get your ducks in a row, optimize the hell out of that software and maybe even drop some pre-loaded junk software altogether. It would be a damn shame for the G2 to not be a contender, since it ticks all the right boxes in the design department, sports a stunning Full HD screen and packs a massive 3,000 mAh battery. A damn shame indeed!

Sources: Android Police, Android Community, Droid-Life, BD Play, XDA Forum and GSM Insider