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What’s with All the Galaxy smartphones?

samsung-phones

 

Even though there are rumors about Apple bringing a few different models into the game this year to compete with the teeming masses of other Galaxy smartphones, the Cupertino-based company has previously managed to sell incredibly well with just one premium smartphone each year.

It seems Samsung has taken a very different approach though, and instead of just offering one worldwide model, it now has a huge amount of handsets. This year has certainly been the most noticeable, and I’d probably bore you trying to think up all of the handsets Samsung has released this year.

Would it be better for Samsung to stick to just a few handsets each year and should we criticize Samsung for flooding the market with their Galaxy branding, or is Samsung doing an acceptable thing to the smartphone market?

Whilst Samsung reached new levels of fame with their Galaxy range, particularly the S2 and  the S3, they’ve since moved on from being a fairly small-time player in the Android ecosystem to becoming the face of the OS, and have now reached such a global recognition that many will recognize a ‘Samsung phone’ over an Android phone.

This ‘branding’ has been planted all over the world- whether you’ve got an S4, an S3, a Mini, a Note or any other Galaxy handset, you’ll recognize the shape and design of the phone immediately. Cities are often filled with advertisements for their smartphones, and the Galaxy range has now been plastered over TV and the internet too.

We’ve recently learnt about the Galaxy S4 Active, and rumors are circling about multiple Galaxy Note 3 handsets, and it finally hit me today that I shouldn’t care about the mass amount of Galaxy handsets out there.

Samsung have the manufacturing power to create a handset of every size, and Samsung are using it. There is practically at least one Galaxy handset for every screen size in inches from about 3 inches to 10.1 inches, and dozens more in between. As a customer, this gives us a huge amount of choice. Customers can find just the size they want, and still be a part of the Galaxy experience they recognize so well.

You may complain that Samsung are now riding on the fame that they achieved from being a new and different experience from the dull iOS range, but if that’s the case, you always have many other manufacturers to choose from.

Perhaps Samsung should meet in the middle and continue to release handsets at a pace they’re happy with, but cut out the shouting and glamorizing each time a new handset reaches the market.