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Rise of Mobile Devices Led to the Closure of Google Reader

[Photo Source: Wired]

[Photo Source: Wired]

July 1 marks the end of the services of Google Reader. Longtime users of the RSS platform saw this one coming for a few months already with Google announcing the schedule of its closure way back in March. But still, many were disappointed with the move of the company.

Reason for Closure

The reports from BGR and Wired said that the eventual demise of the platform is due to the rise of mobile devices today. Basically, the way that people consume news nowadays is much different than they were before. The fact that many people still use the service cannot be discounted but the huge decline of its users no longer justifies its continuous operation stated the news sites.

Richard Gingras, Senior Director of News & Social Products at Google, said in his interview featured in Wired that people are now more engrossed in checking news over the course of the day using their tablets and Smartphones. He said in the interview that the trend is quickly replacing the old standard behavior of people in terms of news consumption over breakfast along with a leisurely read at the end of the day.


Google Now’s approach is now inclined with the change in the way that people see news said the same report. Using AI techniques, the program can immediately learn the tastes and habits of its users. This makes it very effective in delivering the preferences of the person using a mobile device to read articles.

Another good alternative for the Google Reader is the Google+, said the news source. The services of Google plus is more focused on leisurely interest reading.

A Marketing Approach

Wired commented though that this might be a strategy from Google to keep more customers into their world. It is actually a de-emphasis of content source it added. For example, instead of leading people to their preferred sites like Bloomberg, Wall Street Journal or CNN, the services keeps them tuned instead to what Google Now or Google+ have to offer.

Sources: BGR and Wired

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