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Pelican Imaging CEO Confirms Array Cameras For Nokia Smartphones In 2014

pelican imaging camera

[Photo Source: Engadget]

We have featured an article just recently about the move of Nokia to invest in Pelican Imaging in order to develop a new 16 lens array camera for its future smartphones. And now, the CEO of the company just confirmed their partnership with the smartphone developer.

The Big Announcement

Chris Picket, the CEO of Pelican Imaging, just announced that their new 16-lens array camera will be integrated with at least one Nokia smartphone in 2014. He declined to comment though which unit will benefit with their new technology. However, he did comment that their new product is currently being tested by various developers. Again, he did not reveal the names of the developers he was talking about.

The Features

Picket highlighted the features of the new 16 lens array camera which was developed by his company. He said that the 16 lens will have a 4 by 4 grid imaging channel. This is unlike the current smartphone cameras that we have today that has just one of everything. Each sub-camera of Pelican Imaging is designated to capture only one color like red, blue or green.

The use of sub-cameras will provide an effective way for noise reduction due to the images cross-talking. Then, the outcomes of each sub-camera contain 3D depth information too. There will be less noise at low lighting with focus for the entire scene also. This will provide a more crisp image as compared to the current camera phones that we are using.

Now, combining the Pelican technology together with Nokia’s already existing PureView technology with the inclusion of their 41MP sensor or the PureView 808 plus the floating lens stabilization of the Lumia 920 will surely make the Nokia smartphones of the coming year stand out in terms of capturing images.

The only drawback of the output of the new camera is that it will eat up more memory than the usual images that traditional smartphone cameras generate. Engadget says that the size increase would be around 20 percent.

Sources: Tinh te and Engadget

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