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Microsoft Lashes Out that Upgrades Don’t Mean Admission of Windows 8 Failure


When news came out that Microsoft is making changes to its new operating system, critics considered the move as an admission of Windows 8 failure according to TechRadar. Critics mocked the company and said that bringing the some features back from its predecessor would be a clear indication of the ultimate failure of the OS.

Among the drastic changes in Windows 8, which received a huge heat from their customers, is the removal of their traditional Start button. Even Microsoft was quick to admit that their survey has shown that majority of their customers did not like the move. So, as a way to get back the support of their users, the company announced that they will be bringing back the feature on their Windows 8.1, also known as Windows Blue. According to the source, the upgraded OS with refreshed features will be launched at the Build Developer’s Conference in June.

Financial Times likened the move of Microsoft in backtracking their product with the New Coke fiasco of Coca-Cola that happened nearly three decades ago. The report explained that the move by Microsoft to ax some its new features to give way to the removed ones will be like admitting commercial failure, like what Coca-Cola did.

Microsoft’s Defense

The PR guy of Microsoft, Frank Shaw, said that their move should be seen in another light instead of looking at it as a mere move to backtrack from the Windows 8 failure, because all that they are doing is following the demands of their customers. Any changes that they are doing now with their product are essential in its improvement, he said.

Citing the official Microsoft blog by Shaw, TechRadar said that the company executive accused the media of sensationalizing the move of his company just to generate publicity. Shaw lashed out that instead of looking at the decision of his company in a bad way, the media should look at the core of their action which is listening to their consumers and giving them what they want.

Source: TechRadar and Financial Times

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