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Apple vs Samsung: Cupertino-based Company Asks Court To Review Android Source Code

clash of the titans
[Photo Source: Android Authority]
The Apple vs Samsung court drama continues. The never-ending battle between the two tech-giants takes a turn once more as the Cupertino-based company is asking the court to grant them access to the documents held by Google about its Android operating system according to Bloomberg.

Apple requested U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul S. Grewal of San Jose, California to ask for the said documents said the report. The company’s reason is that Google has been withholding information about it to protect the interest of Samsung.

Bloomberg pointed out that the current issue is related to the second patent-infringement lawsuit which Apple filed in the same court against Samsung.

The news source added that the OS by Google serves as a platform for the alleged products that were infringed. In Apple’s words, the OS “provides much of the accused functionality,” said the report by Bloomberg.

The Arguments of All Sides

Mark Lyon, an Apple attorney, explained to Grewal that the move aims to bring about transparency. He also stated that Google is not doing a full search on the questioned items.

Blomberg further said that a dispute about the matter of evidence gathering has been raised last year by Apple. The subject of the argument is the technology that was used in developing smartphones like the iPhone 5 and Samsung Galaxy S3.

On the other hand, Matthew Warren, a Google attorney who happens to represent also Samsung, objected to the move. He told Grewal that Apple has made a “strategic decision” when they filed the case because they advertently kept Google off the complaint.

With Google not included in the filed complaint, it effectively makes them a third party in the case. Thus, the company does not enjoy the same legal rights that Apple and Samsung have.

In addition, Google is worried that just handing over the source codes to Apple will entitle the Cupertino firm access to confidential information that are not even related to the complaint.

Source: Bloomberg