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Google In Trouble With EU For Android

goo2As the cyber space gets more competitive, stiff is becoming the scenario of rivalry. Now being the most powerful catalyst of the virtual world, Google has been accused of using anti-competitive behavior to get an upper hand on its competitors. In a recent move the European Union (EU) is probing in to the subject as to whether Google has really been trying to find a way ahead of its opponents via unfair means with the help of the supreme position they hold by their mobile operating system – Android. It can be mentioned that as per research data from an international market research firm IDC, the market share of Google’s Android based on units shipped stood at 70.1% during the fourth quarter of 2012 while it was only 52.9% in the same quarter the previous year. But in a prior allegation to this, it had been claimed that Google controls the Internet display search results favoring own services while disfavoring the ones from the competitors.

In a recent interview with The New York Times, Joaquin Almunia, the EU competition chief commented that the two probes against Google is progressing separately and EU Officials are already working on the issues. But any further comment was declined by the chief. The fresh charge has however been filed by a group of companies comprising Microsoft, Nokia, and Oracle; under the banner of Fairsearch Europe. As per the plaintiff, Google, with its “emerging monopoly power” is trying “to shape consumers’ mobile Internet experience and not necessarily for the better.” It further alleged that the Web giant is creating a “deceptive way” for Google apps through its Android smartphones. They also said that Google is changing the rules of mobile eco system by persuading app developers, device makers, mobile payment enablers, network operators, and advertisers to support Google.

Google however has so far been cooperative with the EU Commission and has recently put forward proposals which might help a customer to identify when Google will favor its own product or service instead of an opponent’s.

FROM: CNET