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T-Mobile Responds In Style, Puts AT&T on the Defensive

T-Mobile's AT&T Response Ads

[Photo Credit: T-Mobile]

It’s not every day that customers get to see two national carriers duke it out in advertisements and commercials. In most cases, when two carriers compete against each other for consumer loyalty, consumers expect carriers to compete for additional customers respectfully. There has always been mutual respect between carriers, and I think that there is nothing better than honest competition.

AT&T, however, went overboard when the American Telephone and Telegraph Company published a humiliating ad about T-Mobile a few days ago. The company’s ad was all about T-Mobile’s slow speeds and low prices. In other words, the message was clear: pay a smaller monthly fee, and you get what you pay for (cheap bill equals low-quality data speeds).

T-Mobile spent this week responding to AT&T’s advertisement with a few proverbial punches of its own. T-Mobile issued three advertisement responses this week:

1) “Can you see the beads of sweat in this ad?”

2) “What Keeps AT&T Up At Night? Apparently Us.”

3) “If AT&T Thought Our Network Wasn’t Great, Why Did They Try To Buy It?”

The first advertisement refers to AT&T sweating in fear because of T-Mobile’s great phone plans. The second ad is one of my favorites, since it says that, in so many words, AT&T is restless, looking behind its shoulder and plotting strategy at night in order to get one step ahead of the competition (T-Mobile).

The third ad is the best of the three:  “If AT&T thought our network wasn’t great, why did they try to buy it?” The ad makes an excellent point about the whole ordeal. What company would purchase a network that it did not have some interest in or deem appealing? Since AT&T wanted to own T-Mobile, it is apparent that AT&T thought that t-Mobile completed its picture of the ideal company, a picture that AT&T obviously did not think it could complete going solo.

Let’s be honest: AT&T sees T-Mobile as a serious competitor these days. With all that’s been said about the company’s slow 2G EDGE network and its dropped calls, I never imagined that AT&T saw T-Mobile as a serious threat to its network and customer base. A little trip across the Internet will take you to dozens of forums where AT&T customers are all too happy to have AT&T smartphone plans while piggybacking off of T-Mobile’s network.

I am writing this article after discussing the cheapest smartphone plan with an AT&T representative who told me that the lowest smartphone plan (450 anytime minutes, 5000 minutes on nights and weekends, 300MB of data) would cost me anywhere from $85-$90 a month, including taxes. For just $70 a month, I can access T-Mobile’s 4G network and have unlimited voice, text, and data (no throttling). If smartphone plan costs mean anything, AT&T should be scared — real scared.

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