To Top

Why the “S” in “IPhone 5S” May Stand for Siri: Apple Hires Siri Engineers and Writers

Siri Joke

I have written in articles prior that the newest iPhone to debut this coming Summer could be named the “5S” because of Siri. Apple has expanded Siri’s capabilities in iOS6, and Cupertino looks to do the same in iOS7 (I imagine). Apple has already called for new writers for Siri, so as to provide even more witty statements than the personal assistant already says in iOS6. Siri has come to learn how to greet iOS users, how to respond to simple human responses (when you say “thank you,” she says “you’re welcome,” “I live to serve,” or my personal favorite, “it is I who should be thanking you”), and how to post Facebook statuses and Twitter tweets. She can open certain apps, set your alarm clock and reminders, and even provide sports scores while the current sports game is still on television. I attended a local Red Robin restaurant one night and saw my college alma mater playing another college team. The game was still on, so I asked Siri about the sports score of the game at the moment; sure enough, she provided accurate results, as can be seen in the photo below:


Carolina:Miami Game


Apple said at the 2012 Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) that it intends to extend Siri beyond the iPhone to the iPad (which it did), followed by its extension into the automobile and Mac OS. IPad owners acquired Siri as part of iOS6, but Apple’s promise about Siri’s entrance into the world of Mac OS has yet to be accomplished. Now would be the perfect time to do so, come July 2013.

This week, the Cupertino, California company decided to publish a job ad in which Apple requests UI engineers who will expand Siri’s role in iOS and bring the cherished voice command to Mac OS. The engineers will “join the team that implements the UI for Siri,” which means that they will work in conjunction with Apple’s current Siri team. Siri will become “an OS within an OS,” as specified by the job ad. What this means, we believe, is that Siri will have a major presence within Mac OS. This goes beyond integration Siri with new apps in iOS—although it seems as though the job ad calls for it.

Siri’s dictation features have been added to Mac OS as of last year, but she does not have the full-range capabilities that she does in iOS6. With voice command, Mac OS users will be able to have Siri open apps, send emails, type letters and social media statuses and comments, and even set appointments and reminders. Apple’s desire to extend Siri to Mac OS is all part of Apple’s plan to increase hype over its laptops and desktops, which are falling in revenue for the company. Apple is still leading the way in its laptops and iMacs, while Windows is seeing a downward trend in its laptop sales. Still, whether Apple, Lenovo, or Hewlett-Packard, laptop sales are falling – due to the cannibalization of iPad and mobile tablet sales. Consumers have decided these days that tablets are more mobile than laptops and more inexpensive than laptops.

This is not the first attempt Apple is making this year to restore appeal to its laptops and Mac OS. The company has also placed a job ad for an “iOS Software Engineer,” someone who must be familiar with “Gigabit Internet.” Apple intends to produce 802.11c Internet for its latest 2013 MacBooks, an Internet technology that will produce speeds three times as fast as that of current 802.11a/b/g/n technology (1.3Gbps as opposed to 4.5Mbps). Expanding Siri to Mac OS is all a part of maintaining its MacBook collection in order to save it from death.

More in Apple