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Now an App that can flush your Toilet, too!

Smartphone-Powered-Toilet-For-Android1-665x385We are moving closer to the day when, perhaps, there would be an app for everything. Well, you can fantasize about the creative ways in which these apps can enrich our lives, but never would your mind entwine around this bizarre conception- an app that can flush your Toilet, offer “butt showers”, provide heated seating, turn on the music, and perhaps, do everything to accept your ‘waste’ gracefully.

A Japanese toilet company, Lixil, has turned this bizarre fascination into an indubitable reality. It has created a Google Android powered-toilet that can be controlled using a simple app on your Android device. The app allows you to remotely open and close your toilet-seat, heat it, spray warm water to rinse, and even blow warm air to dry things around.

As mentioned, the app also allows you to play music in the toilet through the in-built speakers fitted inside the toilet. The Japanese company has used Bluetooth wireless protocol for communication between smartphones and the toilets.

The list of obnoxious things the app can do still does not end here. The app also maintains a ‘Toilet Diary’, which can be handy for your practitioner, in case you are not in the best of your health. The app also allows you to track the water and electricity consumption of each flush, and can be programmed individually to suit your preferences.

While many may look at this as an impalpable way of integrating technology, for the Japanese, it’s a whole new innovation. Let’s not forget that Japan has always been the fore-runner in designing the world’s most multi-functional commodes.

For now, the Inax toilet app works only for Android, but an iOS version is under development and would be released in the near future. The company is going to make this technology available by next year. However, Satis is going to be priced at an inordinate price-tag of $4500.

In a country, where most subway commodes are sustained by just one mere hole in the ground, this could perhaps be an ideal step towards a ‘much-needed’ innovation. However, considering the level of pranks that can be deployed, we are not sure whether these commodes would be actually deployed at public places.

Share your thoughts on this! Do you think the Japanese have created something ingenious? Or do you think this is too much of a waste after just ‘waste’?