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iMessage still has performance issues

If you are an iMessage, iCloud, Face Time, or Game Centre user, you would have experienced the outage a few times in the last month, and the last week as well. There have been two outages recently, which have left the users very frustrated. The Cupertino tech giant is not having a good time after it released the iOS 6 operating system. First it was it with the new Maps apps, and now the iMessages, Face Time, and Game Centre. Wired puts forward a couple of the tweets from iMessage users:

“I hate when my iMessage decides to not work and my texts send as actual text messages #annoying,” disgruntled user @KellyTurner tweeted last week. Another user, @adamtheteen, echoed that sentiment in the midst of the second bout of iMessage downtime this week: “I hate when iMessage just randomly stops working.”

According to Apple’s latest stats, there are 140 million iMessage users worldwide, and they are sending 28,000 iMessages every second. That is very clearly a very big number, and the company needs to have enough infrastructure to support such cloud service. On October 25th, Face Time and iMessages were down, leaving users angered. Again, Tuesday afternoon, most of the iCloud services were down, including iMessage, Face Time, and Game Centre. Users were obviously very enraged. Gartner analyst Brian Blau told the following to Wired via email:

While I don’t believe these are serious, it’s not typical of Apple to have these types of system issues. You would expect that Apple would address the problems immediately, and if we see more outages, then Apple should at least let users know the source of the problems.

Wireless carriers are helpless in resolving these issues. Wired says that both AT&T and Verizon referred to Apple when it asked about these outages. And Apple usually does not address such issues. Apple really needs to fix a lot of issues pertaining to its iOS 6 based services, for its customers to be happy to pay again next year for the new piece of hardware it will release.

Source: Wired