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Facebook employees advised to use Android over iOS

The global leader in market research, IDC (International Data Corporation), predicted that by 2016, devices running Android operating system will outsell iOS devices. The biggest social media network, Facebook, used this data to convince its employees to use Android devices over iPhone or iPad. It may sound a bit troubling but the company is actually trying to seek help from its own employees to provide better support for its Android app.

It was in August this year that Facebook started urging its employees to help find problems and flaws in its application currently being offered free at the Google Play Store. It was also during that time that the app has been a subject of criticisms because bugs haunted users and there was no support from its developer. While many have been so pessimistic about FB’s acquisition of Instagram, but looking at the bright side, the acquisition actually helped in the improvement of Facebook application as well as the messenger.

Just recently, a set of photos were published online showing posters with Facebook’s help desk email urging its employees to “switch today;” the company calls it “droidfooding.” One of the posters shows a graph suggesting what would become of the Android 3 years from now and how it would outsell iOS.

Mashable reported that these posters were left hanging on Facebook’s wall in its headquarters in Menlo Park, California. The most apparent reason for this is that the company wants its employees to test out its own product and help find problems so they would be addressed immediately before millions of users can discover them.

Having almost a billion users worldwide and majority use smartphones, Facebook app is one of the most downloaded free apps from the Google Play Store. As of this writing, Facebook for Android has been downloaded 5,595,067 times and the most recent update was rolled out on November 16th. Many of the problems before have already been fixed and the app is compatible to almost all Android devices.

[source: Mashable | via: Tom’s Hardware]