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Google Executive Eric Schmidt Talks About Apple-Android Tech Battle, Microsoft Emergence

Google’s executive chairman Eric Schmidt said the current battle between Android and Apple will define the future of tech market arena.

Schmidt, who assumed the top executive post for Google from 2001 to 2011, insisted current tech war between Android and Apple is by far the most competitive, even bigger than the 90s desktop computing tussle between Apple and Microsoft.

“The Android-Apple platform fight is the defining fight in the industry today,” Eric Schmidt said in an interview with Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher in New York, according to Cnet.com.

According to Schmidt, the volume of mobile devices sold by two companies is so enormous dwarfing the sale generated at the peak of the Apple-Microsoft desktop war.

“The growth rate of mobile adoption exceeds everyone’s expectations every quarter,” he said. “The devices are becoming so useful that unless you’re a significant knowledge worker, you could probably live most of your life with your mobile device,” said Schmidt, who predicts one billion devices running on Android in a year.

Meanwhile, Schmidt also tackles Microsoft as a potential competitor in the tech market as it launched the Microsoft’s Surface tablet.

“Let’s see what this new set of products does,” Schmidt said. “There are well-funded, smart, well-run companies that have not been able to bring up state-of-the-art products.”

Google, Microsoft, Apple, Samsung and other tech companies are in the middle of heated competition to take the lead in the smartphone and tablet markets. Google and Apple have taken slight edge in the segment, but Microsoft could emerge as a real competitor with the unveiling of their newest version of its Windows operating system. Microsoft planned to launch the news OS later this month.

“There’s going to be an explosion of integrated hardware/software solutions that manage your car, life, music, refrigerator,” said Schmidt in an interview with Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher from AllThingsD in New York.

Via: Cnet