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Windows 8 Flash bugs fixed by Microsoft

Flash has been one of the most important technologies or platforms to display multimedia content in browsers. The same technology, which was ported to Google’s Android mobile operating system, is now being taken down from the latest edition of the operating system, Android 4.1, also known as Jelly Bean, due to security reasons.

Most of the attacks on Windows machines have been due to the vulnerabilities that are left unpatched on Flash on the machines, and the number is not less. The latest version of the Windows operating system, Windows 8, comes with the latest release of the company’s internet browser, Internet Explorer 10. In this new release, the company has built Adobe’s Flash right into the core of the browser, trying to copy Google with its Chrome internet browser.

But by doing so, the Redmond software giant has left of lot of gateways open for hackers in Internet Explorer 10. The updates released for Flash on the Internet Explorer 10 have to come from Microsoft through Windows Update and not via Adobe because of the integration of the technology into the software itself.

To patch a few of the vulnerabilities found in the software, eight vulnerabilities to be exact, Adobe did release an update back in August. But the Windows 8 RTM tablets which shipped at the time did not have these updates installed. So they were left unhealed for the threats.

This is a risk, a very big risk, and hence, the software giant promised to fix the issues, but not until late October. But due to the harm it may cause, the company changed its statement and said It would issue an update “very soon.” That “soon” seems to have come now.

PCWorld writes:

Friday’s Flash update will be offered to Windows 8 RTM, and to the final public beta, Windows 8 Release Preview. That sneak peak, which users downloaded free of charge, does not expire until Jan. 31, 2013.

So if you have a Windows RTM machine, you better update your software soon.

Source: PCWorld