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FBI denies hackers’ allegations it stole personal data from millions of Apple device owners

Hacker group that calls themselves AntiSec posted a shocking revelation on Monday alleging the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has in its possession a database that it stores millions of data including unique identifiers for Apple iPhones and iPads. Today, the agency denies all allegations negating the possession of the said database that hackers alleged.

Many tech enthusiasts who understand the value of a unique identifier given to devices criticized Apple for it. iPhones, iPads and iPods (and perhaps its computers and laptops) are given Unique Device Identifiers (UDID) that serve as the backbone for company’s tracking system. The fact is, even iOS app developers will gain access to these data to track the number of users who download their apps.

AntiSec posted over 1 million UDIDs including names that persons are using as description of their devices. If these data can be associated with names of their users, telephone numbers or even physical addresses, it could also be used to hack into other sensitive data such as credit card numbers or bank accounts. Officials said that even if the FBI has access to UDIDs, these strings of numbers and letters couldn’t possibly be used to eavesdrop or track people.

The group said that they were able to hack into the laptop of a certain agent connected with FBI’s cyber action team dubbed as National Cyber-Forensics & Training Alliance (NCFTA). It is a non-profit branch of the bureau consists of tech experts from different sectors including private corporations that share information and deal with all sorts of security threats.

The validity of the data presented by AntiSec hasn’t been verified yet. Officials believe it is just another stunt of the hacking group to destroy the bureau’s reputation following arrests of many suspected hackers connected with global hacking groups Anonymous and Lulz Security. These groups stirred the cyber world by hacking into several databases believed to be the most secured in the world. The same groups also claimed to have defaced some government-run websites including CIA’s.

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image: slate.com