Apple – Samsung Patent War: Judge Lucy Koh Caught in the Middle

Posted on Jul 19 2012 - 10:06am by Laurent

Apple seems to have found a new ally in its fight to stave off the competition from its nearest tablet competitor Samsung. It is old news that the two technology giants have been competing in several countries including the US over several patent rights.

Apple had filed a suit to ban Samsung from selling its 10-inch tablet in the US market on the grounds of its strikingly similar features to the Apple iPad. The case came up for hearing at the court of U.S. District Judge Lucy H. Koh, who is an authority in intellectual property laws, herself. She has about 10 years of experience having practiced law and especially intellectual property laws during private practice and even represented Creative Technology in a lawsuit against Apple, the beneficiary of her recent judgment.

In that case Apple had countersued Creative’s challenge for infringing copyright against the Apple iPod. Apple had to pay Creative $100 million towards licensing fees. Judge Lucy H. Koh declared a ban on the sale of the Samsung tablet, at a critical juncture when the sales for that device were just on the rise. The ban imposed by Judge Lucy H. Koh helped Apple to stave off the challenge from the Samsung tablet.

Judge Ronald M. Whyte, Lucy H. Koh’s mentor, claims that her actions are typical to her. She is known to take things head on and taking things quite seriously. Known for cutting on personal time and investing as much as she can on her career, studying cases and working long hours, Judge Lucy H. Koh has apparently created quite a splash in the tech industry. She is drawing attention from the leaders of the industry. She has taken up hundreds of cases since her appointment by President Barack Obama in 2010.

On their part, the giants in the electronics industry are stepping up their use of patent laws to ensure that there are as little competition for their products as possible. They are also trying to weaken their competition clear the roads for the future.

Via: Washington Post

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