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Nuance Augments Phone Interaction with Swype, Combines Voice and Text

In the avant-garde era of technology, gears have shifted. It’s time for technology to learn from humans rather than other way around.

The newer version of Swype allows you to tap, trace, write and speak. As it is rightly coined, it does more than just predict, it learns. Nuance claims that its new software reads how user forms phrases and sentences in day-to-day life, reads those patterns and accordingly frames certain patters. These patterns are then used to derive accurate predictions. Also, Swype learns some new words which you more commonly use and adds them to its dictionary. You can even integrate your Facebook/Twitter account with Swype to add all of your missives.

The new Swype- interface would leave you jaw-dropped with its dexterity. Swype now comes with full XT9 predictive technology which goes beyond auto-correction of words. It even predicts the next word you are going to type. Thanks to the embedded Tegic algorithms, it can even form sentences and phrases for you.

Swype has also tweaked its auto-correction feature to make sure words land properly even though they have the same path. It understands the semantics of the sentences as well. For instance, words like “pit”, “pot” and “put” would follow the same trajectory (horizontal, that is), but if you are writing a sentence which says “You need to put water in the pit.”, it would detect that water should be preceded by a verb and so “put” would be used instead of “pit”

Swype also inhibits the innovative Dragon Dictation Speech Technology which takes speech-to-text conversion to next level. It recognizes what you speak and types accordingly. Certain words which are uncommon can be keyed in and saved in the Swype dictionary. It has support for over 55 languages which include both written and spoken.

While Google has already integrated Swype into its native platform, it is also available on PlayStore for FREE download. Companies like Research in Motion and Microsoft would build different versions of the software using the kit provided by Nuance. Diversity in unity, perhaps!