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Carmageddon Hitting iOS and Android This Summer

The controversial vehicular game Carmageddon will soon hit Android- and iOS- devices this summer. This game, which came out in 1997 has been optimized for mobile devices, recognizing touch input. Its graphics, interface, and game engine have also been enhanced to cater to today’s audience.


Of course, the elements that made it so popular back then had all been retained. On the surface, Carmageddon looked like your average car racing game. However, it eliminated for the gamers all the limits on the road, allowing them to run over pedestrians and crash into other cars. Because of this nature, it received many protests and was even banned in some areas in Europe. Eventually, its manufacturers created a version that used zombies and green slime instead of humans and blood for the graphics. Still, many felt that the original version was better and sought its revival in its original form.

The original game is what users will be able to download soon for free on Google Play and the iTunes Store. However, the free download is only for the first 24 hours. It is a mere gesture of thanks from company behind Carmageddon for the support it received on the n Carmageddon: Reincarnation Kickstarter web page. Later, users may purchase the app for a fee.

According to the announcement, the Android and iOS app will include a universal app, a variety of touch control gestures, and an intuitive gesture system that permits users to repair and recover the vehicle while playing. Users also have an Action Replay option which would allow them to save their gameplay as a video and show it on Youtube. For iOS users, there is also Game Center integration which would enable users to compare one’s achievements with the other players’.

The Android and iOS version of Carmageddon follows a long history of the game’s porting onto various devices. It was originally available for the PC through DOS in 1997, then for the PC in Microsoft Windows ’97, the Macintosh in 1997, the PlayStation in 1997, the Nintendo 64 in 2000, and Game Boy Color in 2001.