Patent Wars: Samsung Loses Bid To Hault iOS Sales In The Netherlands

Posted on Mar 16 2012 - 11:23am by Kyle

Samsung announced on Thursday that a dutch court rejected their 3G patent bid against Apple’s iPhone and 3G connected iPad. Samsung, like Motorola, has been in the cell phone business a lot longer than Apple. As such, some of the technology in actually connecting calls and data over cellular signals is patented by the S. Korean electronics giant.

The court did say that Samsung could recover damages from Apple in regards to certain Intel chips used in their technology. This is all part of the continuing international patent war between Apple and Samsung. There were rumors earlier this year that Apple and Samsung may sit down to talk mutually beneficial licensing deals but those talks never amounted to anything.

More after the break
In regards to the chips, the Hague court ruled that Samsung could not seek damages pertaining to Qualcomm chips because Samsung has a licensing deal with Qualcomm however they could on Intel chips. We’re not sure how many iPads and iPhones carry the Intel silicon over the Qualcomm.

“(The) ruling by the Hague court provides Samsung with a legal basis to move forward with the protection of our patent rights,” the South Korean firm said in a statement.  “Samsung has and will continue to stand ready to meet its obligations in licensing its technology on fair and reasonable terms.”

The newest iPad, dubbed “The New iPad” also features Samsung electronic parts in the retina display and in the A5x chip. The Samsung units that produce those components are separate businesses from Samsung Mobile and Samsung Mobile must bid out those parts the same way that Apple does. Because they are separate businesses Samsung is supposed to protect the two entities from each other (the chip business and mobile business) to insure that everyone’s intellectual property is protected.

source: Yahoo 7 News

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