CES 2012: Panasonic’s Tough Pad A1 Durability With A Price

Posted on Jan 12 2012 - 8:54pm by Kyle

Panasonic, the creators of the ultra rugged “tough” line of laptop computers, has added an Android Honeycomb tablet to the mix. We first learned about the Panasonic ToughPad A1 and B1 back in November.  They were showing off the A1 at CES and we got the opportunity to check it out.

Underneath it’s tough exterior the Panasonic Toughpad carries the power of most of the top of the line tablets introduced in 2011. It has a 1.2ghz dual core processor, 10 inch form factor, a 5 mega pixel camera on the rear and a 2 megapixel camera on the front.

It’s running Android 3.2 Honeycomb and a resolution of 768 x1024 pixels.

More after the break

The toughpad line is water resistant, dust proof, shock resistant and temperature proof. It’s IP 65 certified and also certified for use by the federal government.

According to the Panasonic staff person we talked to the tablet is designed to withstand a dust storm in Texas and a cold winters day of riding in a UPS truck.

Their target market with this tablet is the field service technician and distribution and supply line businesses. This is perfect for delivery folks, repairmen and more.

The Toughpad comes with a stylus securely lodged into the read of the tablet. It also has an SD slot, HDMI slot and USB port which are covered from the elements. Interestingly enough there was also a sim card slot for 4G/LTE or 3G.

The Toughpad A1 will be available in Q2 of 2012 and carries a hefty price tag of just $1400, but again this is an enterprise tablet for field reps. Panasonic is working on bringing a line of consumer based tablets to the U.S. later this year as well.

 

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  • Noone

    Is it rated for a Class 1, Division 2, Group C and D electrical environment?

  • ML

    The only thing I don’t like about it, is that “serviceable battery” mention. As an owner, I want to be able to replace batteries, myself. If I can’t do that, I might as well buy an iPad and carry it in an Otter Box. I should be able to easily access the battery compartment at any given time for a switch out or replacement. I don’t want to have to take a tablet to a “service center” for a simple battery issue.

  • Sdpunk1979

    Ever heard of commas and editing? I used to read your shit until I got fed up with your unprofesionalism. Now I remember why