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App Of The Week: Wunderlist

Wunderlist

It doesn’t matter what you do, where you work, or how old you are, everyone worries about getting stuff done. Whether you work a job with countless deadlines, attend high school or college like myself, or have to up your GamerScore on Xbox, people have things to do. Obviously, having a smartphone can help you do this, but more than just scheduling, there are specific applications that can help you make sure you always get everything done. The app I’m going to talk about today is Wunderlist.

Wunderlist is a task manager that, well, helps you manage your tasks. Not in the way apps like Advanced Task Manager kill processes on your device (don’t use those applications by the way), but rather helps you organize your schedule and get things done. Wunderlist is fairly simple, you plug in the things you need to get done, and it notifies you when you need to get things done. There’s not much too it. But that’s the beauty of Wunderlist.

More after the break

 

I have used many task managers–detailed ones with ugly interfaces, and some have no functionality and a terrible UI, but Wunderlist does what some apps can’t or aren’t supposed to. Keep it simple. Yes, there are more capable and functional task managers than Wunderlist, but sometimes that’s not what everyone wants. Something that has limited Android for a while is its advertisement and presentation to the masses. Not necessarily Android itself, but the way companies explain it. For example, Verizon’s DROID campaign has not only confused users on the difference between Android and the DROID brand, but it presents Android as an operating system that only rips through spec sheets and has robotic arms. While this can be effective at times, not everyone wants to know exactly what their smartphone is made of, and would rather see how it can make their lives easier through features and ease-of-use. In the same way, Wunderlist simplifies managing tasks, and gives the user a clean UI from start to finish.

When you open Wunderlist you are greeted with the same layout you will always be greeted with in the app. You are brought to your lists that coordinate your different taks. “Lists” are Wunderlist’s way of categorizing the different tasks a user may have to accomplish, and you can even share lists with other Wunderlist users to collaborate on tasks. These are created by the user, but Wunderlist gives you an “Inbox” list to start off with. In this inbox list is a few tasks that offer as a tutorial for the application, although it doesn’t necessarily need one. On the bottom is a row of different ways you can view your tasks. Next to lists you have the tasks due today, then overdue tasks, tasks you have starred, and “more” ways you can separate your tasks. I find myself using these different tabs all the time, and I particularly like the “overdue tab”, showing things you have yet to accomplish even if it is a minute overdue.

Wunderlist also has push notifications, meaning you will always be reminded when you have a task to be tackled. You can set several different reminders for each task, making sure you are always prepared to get things done. When you do finish a task, all you do is check the box next to it that scratches it off your list. Another thing I love about this app is when you finish tasks, they don’t delete, but instead become “checked off” until you delete them yourself, making it easy to go back and see what you have accomplished. However, for those who don’t like the clutter, you can easily delete a task when you are reminded to complete it.

Probably my two favorite things about Wunderlist are its UI, and multi-platform support. Wunderlist has a beautiful UI, even allowing you to change the background of the app. Wunderlist stays clutter free and really keeps it simple, working fantastically at almost everything does. It’s easy to use and has smooth animations that let you focus on getting things done instead of playing with an ugly app. Wunderlist is also multi-platform, and has clients for Mac, Chrome, iOS, and obviously Android. These clients all sync with each other, and having a native app on all your platforms makes Wunderlist even easier to use, because you can add and check things off wherever you are. While Wunderlist is an awesome app, I do have a few complaints, however. I really don’t like that the time format in the Android app is 24 hours without an option to switch to a 12-hour format. If an app is going for simplicity I really think they should allow a 12-hour clock format. I would also like an option for background syncing to be added, with options for the different intervals a user may want the app to sync with other clients. Other than that, Wunderlist is a fantastic app, and while there may be others with more functionality, Wunderlist succeeds at what it does. It is a smooth, simple client that gets the job done, and looks pretty while it does it, and that is why it is this week’s App of the Week.